Get With The Programme!

Technology is today embedded in almost everything that we do as individuals, societies and organizations. We have come a long way from the early days – yes, I was there – when the primary use of technology was automating operational tasks such as payroll, where benefits – largely cost savings – were clear and relatively easy to achieve. Today, applications of IT enable increasingly strategic and transformational business outcomes. While these outcomes would not be possible without the technology, the technology is only a small part of the total investment that organizations must make to achieve their desired outcome, often only 5% to 20%. The reality is that these are no longer IT projects – they are investments in IT-enabled business change – investments in which IT is an essential, but often small part.

Unfortunately, our approach to managing IT continues to lag in recognizing this shift. We still exhibit “silver bullet thinking” when it comes to IT. We focus on the technology, and delegate – more often abdicate – responsibility for realizing value from the technology to the IT function. In a recent post, IT Value Remains Elusive, I discussed a recent ISACA survey in which 49 percent of respondents stated that the CIO or IT managers are responsible for ensuring that stakeholder returns on such investments are optimized – with 8 percent saying no one was responsible. Technology in and of itself does not create value – it is how enterprises use technology that creates value. With the evolution of how we use IT, a different approach to the management of investments involving IT has become a business imperative if we are to fully realize the potential value of these investments.

Realizing this value requires broadening our thinking to take many more interrelating activities into account – moving beyond stand-alone IT project management to business programme management. Managing programmes of business change where technology initiatives contribute to business results in concert with initiatives to change other elements of the overall business system, including the business model, business processes, people skills, and organizational structure. It also means that accountability now must be shared between the business and the IT function – while the IT function is accountable for delivering the required technology capabilities, it is the business that must be accountable for realizing value from the use of the technology. This includes: deciding which programmes to undertake; ownership of the overall programme – including all the necessary  initiatives ; and ensuring that expected business value is realized over the full life cycle of the investment decision. Further, to support this, the business case for any proposed investment should be: at the programme level; complete and comprehensive – including the full scope of change initiatives required to achieve the desired outcomes; and a “living”, operational document that is kept up to date and used to manage the programme through its full economic life cycle.

We originally introduced programme management as one of the cornerstones of the Benefits Realization Approach in The Information Paradox. With Val IT™, we included it as part of the Investment Management domain (IM). OGC has also introduced Managing Successful Programmes (MSP) and, more recently, Portfolio, Programme and Project Offices (P3O), and the Project Management Institute (PMI) have extended their PMBOK to include Programme Management. The good news is that there is certainly no shortage of resources for those who want to implement Programmme Management. The bad news is that, while many organizations across the world have significantly increased value through their use of Programme Management, they are the “early adopters” with the majority of enterprises still lagging.

One of the reasons for this is that there is a common tendency to view programmes  as large, complex beasts – only applicable to large enterprises – and a mistaken belief that using the term will over-complicate things. Nothing could be further from the truth – certainly not when programme management is intelligently applied. Enterprise Resource Planning, Customer Relationship Management, Supply Chain Management, Business Intelligence, Social Networking, etc. are extremely complex programs of business change. Denying complexity – taking a simplistic view of change – only increases complexity. Only when complexity is understood can it be simplified, and then only so far. As Albert Einstein once said “Everything should be as simple as possible but no simpler.” The line between simple and simplistic is a dangerous one. Implementing organisational change requires changing our “traditional” approaches to governance – it requires that we “change how we change”!   Effective Programme Management is an important part of that change.

Taking the programme view can still however be a very daunting prospect – there can be just too much to take in all at once – unless an appropriate technique is used – one designed specifically for this purpose. In an earlier post, A Fool’s Errand, I discussed the need for a benefits mapping process (using Fujitsu’s Results ChainCranfield’s Benefits Dependency Modelling, The State of Victoria’s Investment Logic Mapping, or some other similar technique) to develop “road maps” that support understanding and proactive management of a programme throughout its full economic life cycle. Using Fujitsu’s Results Chain terminology – the one I am most familiar with – the process is used to build simple yet rigorous models of the linkages among four core elements of a programme: outcomes, initiatives, contributions, and assumptions. With the right stakeholders involved, and supported by strong facilitation, such a process can, in a relatively short time frame, result in clearly defined business outcomes and contributions, enabling management to ensure alignment with business strategy, define clear and relevant measurements, and assign clear and unambiguous accountability. They help to “connect the dots” and facilitate understanding and “buy in” of the those who will ultimately receive the benefits.

The challenge facing enterprises today is not implementing technology, although this is certainly not becoming any easier, but implementing IT-enabled organisational change such that value is created and sustained, and risk is known, mitigated or contained. This is where Programme Management, supported by benefits mapping can and must play a key role. The OGC states that: “The fundamental reason for beginning a programme is to realise the benefits through change.” In a March, 2008 Research Note, Gartner said that “We believe [strategic program management] is the management construct best suited to enable better business engagement, value delivery and risk”. Enterprises who want to enable such outcomes would do well to take a serious look at Programme Management.

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2 Comments

  1. Posted August 31, 2009 at 7:27 pm | Permalink

    I recently conducted a study to help the Victorian Auditor-General’s Office evaluate the role of projects within the public sector. I was surprised to discover that programme management was the area of deficiency that stood out as the major culprit to why billions of dollars of investment over decades had failed to significantly improve strategic objectives like increasing literacy/numeracy, reducing crime and reducing waiting times for health services.

    John, mentions Investment Logic Mapping as a potential programme management technique. What I found is that the ILM examples are not adequately linked to strategic goals e.g. how does fingerprint software reduce crime even if it might reduce processing time of criminals. I looked further at MSP and PMI’s PgMP and all the programme management textbooks that I could find and the academic literature. My conclusion supported by many of the texts is that “program management is not well understood” and that the methodologies are immature. The only technique I find adaptable enough to the emergent nature of strategy delivery is John’s Results Chain but it is a tool without a complete framework to guide program management.

    I am developing an advanced project management course for the University of Sydney to focus on governing organisational change through programmes and portfolios to realise strategic benefits. I am struggling because there is not enough solid material out there and having to create too much myself. This is not good and I would love to hear what else people think exists that will actually help deliver the strategic benefits expected from an investment.

  2. Posted July 27, 2013 at 10:25 am | Permalink

    You really make it seem really easy with your presentation but
    I to find this topic to be really one thing that I believe
    I would never understand. It sort of feels too complicated and extremely huge for me.

    I’m looking forward to your subsequent submit, I will attempt to get the hang of it!

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