Addressing the Behavioural Challenges

In my previous post, Behavioural Change – The Crux of the Value Challenge, I suggested that we don’t need any more frameworks – there is no shortage of books, frameworks, methods, techniques, tools etc. to address the effective governance and management of IT and the use of IT to create and sustain value. It is the adoption of these that is painfully slow. It is human behaviour – or rather our inability to change it –  that is at the core of the challenge. I am currently working – both individually and with others – on a number of initiatives around the need to change how we think, manage, and act – to change behaviour – both individual and group behaviour – from the Boardroom to the front-line.

I also said that I would be looking for ways to broaden the dialogue and to engage with practitioners who are wrestling with these issues on a daily basis. My silence on the blog front has largely been the result of my being engaged with a number of individuals and groups in this space, including a quick trip to Europe and the UK last week, where I met and talked with a number of enterprises – some of whom have been on this value journey for 10 years or more. These discussions, and subsequent reflection, have crystallized a number of thoughts in my mind. These include:

  1. A critical factor in determining success or failure of value management is the presence or absence of a clear owner of the value management issue or process.
  2. The “tipping point” – when value management practices start to get traction and become embedded in enterprises – is when the executive and senior management move beyond awareness and understanding of the issue to commitment to action – beyond “talking the talk” to “walking the talk”. This is illustrated in the figure below (figure and text below is adapted from The Information Paradox). Slide1At the thinking, or cognitive level, we recognize and become aware of a need to change. This often translates itself fairly rapidly into talk: “We at Thorp Inc. have to make fundamental changes to our organization.” All too often, the nature of those changes is not understood, and the definition of them is delegated, or more accurately abdicated. The reaction to this is often “This too will pass,” and all too often, it does. It is only when we wake up at three in the morning, reaching for the antacid, as we feel our stomach churning with the realization of the implications of the change and the breadth and depth of what has to change, that we begin to reach understanding. This is the precursor to commitment. The bottom line here is that we can only “walk our talk” when we fully understand what we are saying. Treating the implementation or improvement of value management practices as an organizational change programme – which it is – the use of some form of benefits modeling, which is discussed later, can bring you to an earlier awakening. When we have the understanding necessary to build commitment, to understand the full extent of what we are committing to, then, and only then, are we ready to act. Even then, we can act only if we have the resource capability and capacity to do so.
  3. Those enterprises that have passed this “tipping point” have been able to effectively apply value management practices to guide informed and intelligent decision-making during the current economic crisis – those that haven’t generally fell back to “old ways” with often across the board cost cuts.
  4. Value management practices are most effective when they are closely integrated with, and part of the business planning process. Going beyond this, they are most effective when they are integrated with overall enterprise governance.
  5. Incremental approaches to implementing and improving value management practices are more successful than  “big bang” ones.
  6. The areas of value management that appear to provide the greatest improvement in value management practices and outcomes are:
    1. Improving the business case process; and
    2. Taking the portfolio view.
  7. The factors that continue to constrain effective adoption of value management practices include:
    1. Failing to define, accept or put rigour into accountability for performance; and
    2. Clearly related to the above, failure to align the reward system such that there are consequences – both positive and negative.
  8. The interventions that appear to have been the most successful in changing behaviours, and helping enterprises move beyond awareness and understanding to commitment and action include:
    1. Inclusive engagement of all the stakeholders through workshops (for more on engagement, see The Challenge of Business Engagement);
    2. Use of benefits modeling techniques in workshops to get everyone “on the same page” – building a broader base of understanding of, and support for value management, including the need for business cases with clear accountability, relevant metrics and an aligned reward system;
    3. One-on-one coaching, and
    4. Active and on-going executive and senior management involvement where they are seen to be “walking the talk”.

In preparation for a workshop with one of the groups I am working with, I put together a short survey with the objective of:

  • Understanding the current and target levels of maturity related to value management (based on  the Value Governance [VG] domain high-level maturity model in ISACA‘s Val IT™ Framework 2.0.);
  • Understanding how long it has taken to reach the current level of maturity, and how long it is anticipated to take to reach the target level;
  • Identifying the factors that have either supported or constrained adoption, and to what extent they have done so;
  • Identifying interventions and the extent to which they have enabled adoption; and
  • Understanding the organizational context of the responding enterprise (optional).

Again, in the interests of broadening the dialogue, I would like to extend this survey to a broader audience. The survey is targeted at individuals who are involved in improving value management practices, including, but not limited to some or all of: leadership behaviour; process implementation and adoption (including business cases, portfolio, programme management and project management); roles, responsibilities and accountabilities (for both supply and demand); organizational structure (including Investment Decision Boards, and Value / Portfolio / Programme / Project Management Offices); information requirements (including metrics and reporting); and supporting tools (data collection, analysis and reporting).

You can access the survey here. The survey should not take much more than 10 mins to complete. The survey has 3 pages, and contains 10 questions.  Questions regarding “Current and target maturity levels”, and “Constraints to adoption and interventions to address” must be answered, but answers to “Organizational Context” questions are optional. Assuming that I get enough responses to yield a meaningful result, I will post results on this site in a later post. All information will be aggregated, and specific information about your organization, if provided, will be treated as confidential and will not be published without your express permission.

One of the challenges that we all have in trying to implement or improve value management practices is the perceived – and indeed real – enormity of the task. As per one of my observations above, this is why an incremental – and often pragmatic and opportunistic – approach is required. The business case, as discussed in an earlier post Lies, Damn Lies, and Business Cases, is the foundation on which all else is built, and, as such, sows the seeds of success or failure. Portfolio management is a powerful tool but if it is populated with “toxic” business cases, it will only give the illusion of progress. This is leading me to focus my attention on the business case and think about how, through workshops and benefits modeling, supported by one-on- one coaching we can change the view of business cases as a bureaucratic hurdle to be got over and then forgotten to being one of the most powerful tools available – turning it from an enemy to a valuable friend! If we can do this, we will have a solid foundation on which to further improve value management practices.

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