The Traveler Returns

To quote Mark Twain, “The reports of my death are greatly exaggerated!” Understandable, however, as it has indeed been quite some time since my last post. This is largely because I have been traveling extensively – a mix of business and  personal time – including Toronto, Asia, Alaska, Vancouver, the UK and Greece. Part of the personal time included a 23 day cruise from Beijing to Vancouver. A quick scan of emails on my return – once I eliminated the 90% related to the (aptly named) Cloud –  had me yet again shaking my head and wondering whether I had not been on a cruise ship at all – rather traveling in Dr Who’s police box time machine – backwards! Here are just a couple of examples:

  • In his May 21st blog, Project Managers Need to Engage IT At the Right Time, commenting on a project predictability seminar, Jim Vaughan says “It was noted that problems with requirements management are rarely with the IT organization and process. This caught me by surprise at first because I usually thought of IT, myself included, as the source of the problem.To get to the right requirements you need the right people to define those requirements. These are not the IT people. If we let the IT people define the requirements we will likely get into trouble. That is why people will blame IT for failed projects. The correct people to define the requirements are the business people and end users.” As this is what I have done for more than 45 years – and what I assumed was well understood, if not common practice – I was amazed that Jim should be surprised by this.
  • In a May 24th Computerworld article by Julia King, These CIOs go way beyond IT-business alignment, she discusses “an admittedly unscientific short list of pioneers in IT-business convergence including  The Progressive Corp., Southwest Airlines Co. and The Procter & Gamble Co.” as well as Vanguard Group and Zappos.com where “business and IT are virtually indistinguishable” and “IT doesn’t just support the business; it enables and continually transforms the business, often creating new revenue and profit streams.” I think that this is great – but why, when we have been talking about this for decades, are there still only a small group of pioneers doing this?

On a more positive note, I attended the CICA conference in Toronto at the end of March, where I gave a Val IT™ workshop, and was pleased to have some people talk to me about Val IT before they even knew who I was, and also to discover that an increasing number of organizations, including the Office of the Auditor General of Canada, are using it, or planning to do so.

In May, I presented at the first annual CMC BC Consulting Conference in Vancouver – how could I resist speaking at a conference with the theme “Charting a course to value”. Among the other topics, there was much discussion about social media and networking and I was pleased to see a tweet sent from Chris Burdge of bWEST who was attending my presentation saying that he was finding it “surprisingly fascinating”. He has subsequently invited me to participate on a panel at a  SocialMediaCamp he’s organizing for October. My son, Jer (blprnt), is quite active in the social media scene, and has a digital art practice in which (I quote) he “explores the many-folded boundaries between science and art”. He and I have been spending quite a bit of time lately discussing the intersection of governance and social media/networking – not just the current preoccupation with how to control social media/networking but, beyond that, how it could be used to improve governance, specifically the quality of decision-making, by tapping into a much broader experience/knowledge base. I may need to spend more time with him before October.

After Vancouver, I headed off to Greece to speak at the Thessaloniki Business Conference. There was an impressive line up of speakers, all of whom had a strong focus on value.  Many of the messages resonated with me, including:

  • Professor Leslie de Chernatony, Professor of Brand Marketing Universita della Svizzera italiana and Aston Business School, who spoke about “Growing out of a recession through more effective brand strategies” stressed that that companies needed to focus on value – not price, to move beyond product quality to outcome quality, and to “watch how you invest”.
  • Howard Stevens, CEO of The HR Chally Group, talked about “Unlocking the Science of Sales Development” and reinforced the value and outcome quality messages saying that there is only a 2-3% difference in product quality between the serious players, all products can be replicated, and what really differentiates the players is the “customer experience”. He also discussed the importance of business analytics and contended that we have information management (IM) backwards – we start with the company executives when we should be starting with the customer.
  • Harold Stolovitch of HSA Learning and Performance Solutions spoke on “Maximizing Workplace Performance in Tough Economic Times” and reiterated the importance of really “walking the talk” when it comes to treating people as “your most important asset” and said that study after study shows that the most important performance blocks are failing to set expectations and failing to provide feedback.
  • Jeremy Hope, Director of the Beyond Budgeting Round Table talked about “How to save 20%-30% on costs, by managing operational bureaucracy and the introduction of modern tools for the running of the Finance Department”, claiming that replacing the annual budget with rolling plans and forecasts could save 90% of time currently spent on the budget process. This is certainly in line with my thinking as expressed in The Budgeting Circus.
  • Dr David Hillson, Director at Risk Doctor & Partners, covered the topic of “Managing risk in innovation projects”. In defining risk as “uncertainty that matters”, he suggested that risks present opportunities as well as threats, with both needing to be managed proactively, and made the case that Risk Management addresses both threats & opportunities in a single integrated process.

I spoke on the role of IT in the economic crisis, and the challenge of maximising the value from IT. I made the case that, while Nicholas Carr might say that “IT [as a commodity] doesn’t matter”, how we manage the change that IT both shapes and enables determines the success or even survival of our enterprises, and business leaders must own and be accountable for this –  it is far too important to be abdicated to the IT function.

En route to and from the Greek conference, I read Joel Kurtzman’s book, Common Purpose. The need for leadership came across in most of the above presentations, and Joel provides a very insightful critique of today’s leaders, and the need for them to move beyond the traditional “command and control” model to establishing a  “common purpose” and creating a “feeling of ‘we’ among the members of their group, team or organization”. I will review this book in greater detail in a later post.

On the subject of books, I am also reading Susan Cramm’s latest book, 8 Things We Hate about IT – as always, Susan is “right on the money” and, again, I will shortly post a review. Also, I  have received a copy of Stephen Jenner’s latest book, Transforming Government and Public Services: Realising Benefits through Project Portfolio Management, which I hope to be able to get to soon and – yes – will again be posting a review.

Hopefully, it will not be 3 months before my next post, but, as I will be slowing down somewhat through the summer – if it ever comes, it may be a while before I get back to being as prolific as I have been in the past.

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  1. […] El viajero regresa – Por John Thorp 21 Junio, 2010 — Carlos Francavilla El viajero regresa – Por John Thorp […]

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