Value Management is not just a challenge for IT

I had the opportunity to deliver the closing keynote to the APM Benefits Management SIG Annual Conference at the National Motorcycle Museum in Birmingham, UK on Tuesday – from my home office in Victoria on Vancouver Island in BC, Canada (the view from which you can see below).
Slide1
The purpose of this blog is not to dwell on the technology that allowed me to do so – which has both advantages (in terms of not having to travel) and disadvantages (in terms of audience engagement and feedback) but to share some thoughts that I got from listening to the presentation that preceded my keynote. The presentation was entitled “Benefits in the Built Environment” and given by Matthew Walker.

Matthew defined the “Built Environment” as being “output centric” and relating to infrastructure programmes in the communications, energy, transportation, waste and water sectors. Within the UK context – and indeed any nation – these are often taken for granted – only thought about when they break – but are of strategic importance in terms of providing an economic backbone, having national security and quality of life implications and impact, and requiring sustainability targets. Investment in these sectors in the UK 2005/6 to 2009/10 has been ~£30b/yr and is currently projected to be ~£50b/yr in 2010/11 and to continue at that level until 2030, with the current drivers for investment in these areas being the economic situation, population growth and carbon reduction. Rising to this challenge requires diversification of investment methods and the political will and capability to make long-term investments. To deliver value for money, this will require prioritization of desired outcomes, and understanding of interdependency’s through effective benefits management, or – in my preferred terminology – value management. Does this sound familiar? This is what we have been talking about in the context of IT – or IT-enabled change programmes – for well over a decade or more! It gets even more familiar.

The track record of benefits management for such infrastructure investments – if you go beyond schedule, cost, and delivery to specification is largely unknown, but the indicators are not good. A 2009 APM report, “Change for the better. A Study on Benefits Management across the UK”, found that >60% of organizations had no more than an informal or incidental approach to benefits management, and ~70% felt that value was added only some of the time, or never.

Matthew’s recommendations included:

  • defining success in terms of benefits;
  • putting benefits management at the heart of oversight and governance of major programmes and projects;
  • increasing awareness and exposure of the business case;
  • using benefits management to prioritize investments; and
  • providing transparency through assurance.

Matthew stressed that achieving such a “benefits renaissance” would not be an “overnight journey”, but one that we must take – the “we” in this case including:

  • funders;
  • professional bodies;
  • business executives; and
  • construction industry practitioners.

I have long said that the issues around realizing value from IT investments or, more accurately investments in IT-enabled change, are not an IT issue but a business issue – a business issue that is not unique to IT. They are a symptom of our preoccupation with cost, activities and outputs, and our failure to move beyond this preoccupation to a focus on value – understanding the desired outcomes of an investment, and the full scope of interdependent effort required to deliver these outcomes, assigning clear accountability for outcomes – supported by relevant metrics and an aligned reward system, and designing and managing complete and comprehensive programmes to deliver those outcomes. Only when we do this – which will require significant behavioural change – will we  address “the challenge of value”,  and begin to consistently create and sustain value  for all stakeholders, including shareholders in the private sector, and taxpayers in the public sector. In today’s complex and rapidly changing economic environment, to quote from “Apollo 13”, “Failure is not an option!” Or, to quote General Erik Shinseki, a former Chief of Staff of the US Army, “If you don’t like change, you’re going to like irrelevance even less!

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  1. […] La Gestión del Valor no es sólo un reto para TI – Por John Thorp 1 Julio, 2010 — Carlos Francavilla La Gestión del Valor no es sólo un reto para TI – Por John Thorp […]

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