After all is said and done, there is more said than done!

As I have travelled around the world over the last thirty years or more, speaking to and talking with thousands of people on the topic of realizing benefits, and creating and sustaining business value from our increasingly significant and complex investments in IT-enabled change, I invariably get these three responses:

  1. You’ve given me a lot to think about;
  2. My boss should have been here; and
  3. Why aren’t we doing this?

In response to the third point, although it also encompasses the second, I decided a number of years ago to write a paper titled “Moving beyond Words to Action”, and submit it for inclusion as a chapter in a book around Enterprise Governance of IT which was being put together by a couple of colleagues of mine. In many ways, the paper was somewhat of a rant – a constructive rant, based on more years than I care to count of trying to get organizations to “get it” when it comes to the challenge of realizing the full potential of creating and sustaining value from the use of IT. I circulated the paper among a number of peers, all of whom provided constructive feedback and positive support, then submitted it to my colleagues. The good news was that they liked the paper, and thought it was much needed. The bad news was that, being academics, they were looking for more academic research for the book, and, as this was an opinion piece, they didn’t see it as a fit (although I was actually asked to write the Foreword for the book!). I was very busy at that time, so basically parked the paper and carried on with my “real” work.

However, I found myself continually going back to the paper, and, over the years since, have reworked and included much of its content in various smaller articles, and posts, and the paper in its entirety has also been used by at least one business school.

I am now, with another colleague, considering embarking on writing another book. Although the book will encompass more than that in the paper, much of the thinking behind the paper will be included. Coming off a week in New York, where I yet again heard the “Why aren’t we doing this?” question many times, I feel that this is a good time to just throw the paper out there in the hope that some readers will find it of value, and also that I will get some more feedback as we start moving ahead with the book.

The paper, the subtitle of which is the title of this post, can be found here Working Chapterv2.0 – it ends with a “call to action”, which I have included below:

Finally, if we are indeed to move beyond words, we must place an emphasis on action—on engagement and involvement at every level of the enterprise. One of the key findings presented in The-Knowing Gap is that knowledge is much more likely to be acquired from ‘learning by doing’ than from ‘learning by reading’ or ‘learning by listening’. This strongly suggests that an iterative step journey toward value management will yield, for each individual, a discrete set of opportunities for learning that, taken together across an organisation of people, form the stepping stones toward cultural transformation and the achievement of real and sustainable change. As Sun Tzu says in The Art of War, “Every journey starts with the first step.” I urge you to move beyond words and take that first step – I can’t promise that the journey will be easy, but without it, value from IT investments will remain elusive.

In reading it, do remember that it was written around seven years ago, long before the terms “digital economy”, “cloud”, “big data”, “BYOD”, etc. were in general use. Also, at the end, I discuss ISACA’s Val IT™ Framework, the development of which I led. While the framework has now been absorbed into ISACA’s new COBIT 5™, it is still available, and relevant – probably even more so – to addressing the challenge of realizing benefits from investments in IT-enabled change.

I hope that you get some value from reading the paper, and look forward to receiving your thoughts.

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