Bridging the Gap between Value Selling and Value Realization

All enterprises exist to deliver value to their stakeholders. Over the last few decades, the way that we use technology – and who uses it, has changed dramatically. Yet one thing that has not changed is the on-going questioning of the value received from our investments involving technology. As we move into an increasingly digital universe, with technology becoming embedded in everything we do, there has never been a more critical time to address this question

As I have discussed in previous posts – “Partnering for value”, and “The IT Value standoff”, technology per se is just a cost – it is how the business uses technology, and manages the change that technology both shapes and enables, that determines whether the technology contributes to business value.

What has been lost in all this is the understanding of, and accountability for managing the increasing breadth and depth of business change that technology both shapes and enables, and which is required if value is to be created and sustained! We need to change the conversation – to change it from one largely about the cost of delivery of technology to one focused on creating and sustaining value from business change.

Business value will only be realized from our increasingly significant and complex investments in IT-enabled change when complementary changes are made in the business – including changes to the governance, business and operating models, business processes and practices, people’s work, and the skills and competencies required to successfully get the work done, reward and incentive systems, organizational structures, physical facilities etc. And, the most difficult, changes to organizational culture, and group and individual behaviour.

The value journey starts with the sales cycle, and it is here where the seeds of success or failure are first sown. Did you know that:

  • Over 95% of B2B buyers demand proof that the vendor will deliver value, demanding financial justification / ROI quantification prior to purchase approval (IDC)
  • Yet, only 7% of buyers say the vendors’  content and sales reps are value-focused (The Economist).

But, buyers’ concerns don’t end when the sale is made:

  • Recent research from IBM (IBM Strategy & Change, Survey of Fortune 1000 CIO’s) reported that organizations said that 40% of total IT spending brought no return to their organization
  • The Standish Group has reported on the success of “IT projects” annually since 1994, with success factors being: on time, on budge; and delivering the expected features. The 2015 report redefined success as being: on time; on budget; and with a satisfactory result, where satisfactory includes:on-target (% requirements);  satisfied (very high to very low); value (very high to very low); and alignment with strategic corporate goal (precise to distant). They then summarized the outcomes of projects over the last five years using the new definition of success factors, as shown in the table below.

Standish2015

The number of successful projects is relatively unchanged over the 5 years at a dismal 27 – 29%. In fact, in every year since the  report was first published in 1994, the percentage has been close to that range. It is little wonder, given these numbers, that we are seeing an increased concern around value.

As enterprises move into the digital age, if we continue to do things the way we have been, the challenge will only increase:

  • McKinsey, in a recent report (The digital tipping point. McKinsey Global survey results 2014) reported that most organizations have only a basic grasp on the value that digital can create, need to understand better how to match priorities and investments with the areas of highest value, and must work to ensure that their structures and business processes are set up to take full advantage of the opportunities that digital efforts offer.

This is both a challenge and an opportunity for sales professionals. Building  awareness, understanding, and commitment to make the necessary changes should be a joint responsibility of vendors (as well as consultants) and their enterprise clients. This has been the “elephant in the room” for the last 2 – 3 decades, and we will come nowhere near to realizing full business value of these enterprise investments in IT-enabled change is we don’t surface and deal with it.

I have recently been working with a group of sales professionals and consultants in setting up the Value Selling and Realization Council (VSR Council). The proposed charter of the Council is to:

Maximize value from investments in IT-enabled change by establishing, promoting and adopting value management methods, standards, practices, tools, and training that enable B2B solution providers and enterprise corporate executives to collaborate in developing and executing a “roadmap to value” approach, in order to optimize the business outcomes from such investments.

This is an ambitious agenda – one which, if it is to be successful, and not fall into the old “don’t confuse sell with install” mindset, has to address the “elephant in the room” by adding the missing piece between selling value – getting the client to understand the potential value of the proposed investment, and realizing value – the client actually realizing or even exceeding the expected value. This missing piece is enabling value – building the awareness, understanding, and commitment to make the complementary business  changes that are required for value to be realized.

The figure below provides a model of Value Management, and illustrates that a value mindset and supporting structures, processes, roles, responsibilities, and metrics must be established as part of enterprise governance, and that value enablement is a very significant piece of the Value life-cycle – the bridge between selling value and actually realizing it.

Slide3Unfortunately, it is the piece that has been largely ignored, or paid lip service to up till now. This is where the VSR Council has the opportunity to make a real difference, by building a pro-active community of value-focused individuals, including sales professionals, industry analysts, value consultants, and client enterprise professionals and leaders.

The Council is only a few months old, but already boasts a long list of senior level managers from companies such as IDC, SAP, Oracle, Workday, Adobe, Microsoft, Alexander Group, Unisys, Sirius Decisions, Finlistics, Alinean, DecisionLink, IBM, Accenture, JDA, NetApp, EY, KPMG, VMware, Effisoft, etc. Take a few minutes and watch a short video from a few of the founding members (I’m the oldest looking one!).

I attended a first meeting of the Council in Dallas in October. I have to say that I went with some skepticism, not knowing how many people might show up, what their experience might be, how open as competitors they would be with each other, or what their views of value management were – particularly value enablement and realization. By the end of the day, my skepticism had disappeared. We were expecting 15 attendees, and 22 showed up, there was a breadth and depth of understanding of the value space, and a very open discussion, displaying both a broad understanding of the challenges of value management, and a passion to work collaboratively to address them.

As a non-profit, the VSR Council depends upon the time contributions of its members. If  you are  interested in furthering the work of the Council, and “connecting the dots” to value, individual Community membership is free – just click here to register to become a member and join the community. To connect with the community, you can also join the VSR Linkedin Group here. Also, please consider becoming an active member by volunteering yourself or someone working with you on one of the working committees. Help the Council build something great and connect those dots!

A great way to kickstart your involvement in the community is by attending the upcoming VSR Summit, a networking and educational event scheduled for February 29th thru March 1st, 2016 at the Marriott Courtyard DFW North in Grapevine, Texas.  There is a cost to attend and capacity is limited so, if you or anyone else you may know are interested, you should register soon.

We are today at a “tipping point” where, if we are to come anywhere near realizing the full potential of a digital world, we need to connect the dots from ideas to the realization of value. We will not do this with traditional siloed and fragmented disciplines and approaches. The VSR council provides the opportunity to create a professional value management community, connecting those dots, and providing leadership in enabling organizations to create and sustain value from technology-enabled change. I hope that I have the opportunity in the months and years to come to meet and work with many of you in this community to achieve this goal.

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