A Value-Driven Framework for Change

In an earlier post, The Future of IT, I mentioned the Strategic Governance Framework, introduced in the Afterword of the revised edition of The Information Paradox, and that over the next few months, I would be introducing this framework (which I now refer to as the Strategic Enterprise Governance Framework). Well, it has taken much longer than I had intended, but in this post, one that I must admit is somewhat drier than my usual posts, I introduce the Framework, and briefly describe each of the ten major elements that it comprises. In subsequent posts, I will describe the individual elements, and the relationships between them in greater detail.

Although more than a decade has passed since the The Information Paradox was first published,  the nature of enterprise value—and how to achieve it—continues to be a subject of much discussion. It is clear that the failure to realize business value from investments in IT-enabled change described in the book is a symptom of a wider malaise—one that presents managers with significant new challenges. The fact is, the track record for implementing any major change successfully continues to be  terrible. Although arguably more visible with IT, the same applies to any large-scale investment or change.

One of the root causes for this poor track record is the woeful inadequacy of current governance approaches to manage what is, in most cases, “an uncertain journey to an uncertain destination.” All too often, current practice results in a lack of understanding of the desired outcomes, and the full scope of effort required to realize the outcomes, not knowing what to measure, not surfacing and tracking assumptions, and not sensing and responding to changing circumstances in a timely or well-considered manner.

In the Afterword,  I described how our thinking and practices had evolved beyond the Benefits Realization Approach introduced in the first edition, to a broader strategic governance framework – a framework for overall enterprise governance. Since that time, I have further extended the framework, as illustrated below, from the original seven elements to ten.

The first, and overarching element of the framework is Strategic Governance  – governance being  traditionally defined as the system by which enterprises are directed and controlled and as a set of relationships between a company’s management, its board, its shareholders and its other stakeholders which.  Strategic Governance establishes how direction and control is accomplished within and across the other 9 elements of the framework which I refer to here as “management domains”. This direction and control will have both compliance and performance aspects, both of which must be considered. From a performance standpoint (and to some extent compliance in the case of risk) I add the dimensions of cost, benefit and risk across the Strategic Governance framework to show that these factors have to be taken into consideration when decisions are being taken in or across the management domains.

The nine “management domains” are:

  • Strategy Management – Defining the business…mission, vision, values, principles, desired outcomes and strategic drivers to provide direction and focus for understanding, configuring and managing assets to deliver the greatest value.
  • Asset management – Managing the acquisition, use and disposal of assets to make the most of their service delivery potential and manage the related risks and costs over their entire life (source: Vicnet, State of Victoria, Australia).
  • Architecture Management – Understanding, communicating and managing the fundamental underlying design of the components of the business system, the relationships between them and the manner in which they support the enterprise’s objectives.
  • Programme Management – Managing the delivery of change around business outcomes through a structured grouping of activities (projects) designed to produce clearly identified business results or other end benefits.
  • Portfolio Management –  Managing the evaluation, selection, monitoring and on-going adjustment of a grouping of investment programmes and resulting assets to achieve defined business results while meeting clear risk/reward standards.
  • Project Management –  Managing a group of activities concerned with delivering a defined capability required to achieve business outcomes based upon an agreed schedule and budget.
  • Operations Management – Managing the production of goods and/or services efficiently  – in terms of converting inputs (in the forms of materials, labor, and energy) into outputs (in the form of goods and/or services) using as little resources as needed, and effectively – in terms of meeting customer requirements.
  • Management of Change – A holistic and proactive approach to managing the transition from a current state to a desired state.
  • Performance Management – The definition, collection, analysis and distribution of information relevant to the management of investment programmes and assets so as to maximize their contribution to business outcomes.

While the framework may at first look intimidating, it should not be seen as such. Many, if not all functions within these domains are already being done to a greater or lesser extent in enterprises today, often in many different ways, with little communication between them. It is the management of the critical relationships between these “management domains” which, if managed well, can provide tremendous strategic advantage to enterprises, but which, if not managed well, can have serious, if not catastrophic consequences. If enterprises are to maximize the value from their investments in IT-enabled change, or any form of change, these relationships need to be understood, and managed within a dynamic, “sense and respond” governance framework.

In subsequent posts, I will describe each of these domains, and the critical relationships between them, in greater detail. In the meantime, I encourage you to think about the state of governance in your organization, or in organizations that you are working with, and consider:

  • Are all the management domains included?
  • How completely and effectively are they covered?
  • Are they dealt with holistically, or within silos?
  • How well are the relationships between the management domains, or between the silos covered?
  • How effective is the governance of these domains and relationships in sensing and responding to changes in today’s complex and rapidly changing environment?

Value from IT – There is a Better Way!

I have just returned from a hectic, but very successful couple of weeks in Australia. There I had the opportunity to meet with and talk to many people, including many CXOs, on the topic of “Delivering on the Promise of IT”. Overall, I was encouraged that there is more awareness of the need to do better when it comes to managing IT investments, but discouraged that there is still little awareness of how to do so, and even less appetite to take it on. As always, at the end of many sessions, a frequent reaction was “you have given us a lot to think about.” As I continue to say, we certainly need to think before we act, but thinking cannot be a substitute for action. A couple  of people echoed a comment that my friend Joe Peppard from the Cranfield  School of Management in the UK told me he had had from a senior executive of a European bank – “I didn’t know there was a better way.”

Well, there is a better way! As originally presented close to 15 years ago in The Information Paradox, proven Value Management practices exist, including, but certainly not limited to ISACA’s Val IT™ Framework, including:

  • Portfolio Management – enabling evaluation, prioritization, selection and on-going optimization of the value of IT-enabled investments and resulting assets;
  • Programme Management – enabling clear understanding and definition of the outcomes and scope of IT-enabled change programmes, and effective management of the programmes through to their desired outcomes;
  • Project Management – enabling reliable and cost-effective delivery of the capabilities necessary to achieve the outcomes, including business, process, people, technology, and organizational capabilities; and
  • Benefits Management – the active management of benefits throughout the full life-cycle of an investment decision.

This is illustrated in the figure below.

If enterprises are to successfully adopt and meaningfully use these practices, their leaders will have to change their behaviour. They will need to acknowledge that this is not an IT governance issue, it is an enterprise governance issue. Further, they will have to evolve from an enterprise governance model rooted in a culture of delivery (of technical capabilities) to one based on a culture of value – creating and sustaining value from investments and assets (for more on this, see a recent paper that I wrote with the Benefits Management SIG of the APM in the UK). In the IT context, this means recognizing that we are no longer dealing with “IT projects”, but with increasingly complex programmes of organizational change – change that is often both shaped and enabled by technology, but of which the technology is only a small part.

They should start by focusing on the business case. The business case sows the seeds of success or failure. Most today are woefully inadequate – based on “delusional optimism” and “strategic misrepresentation” (aka lying!), resulting in:

  • limited or no clarity around desired outcomes
  • limited or no understanding of the scope (“depth” and “breadth”) of change required to achieve the outcomes;
  • failure to balance “attractiveness” with “achievability” (including organizational change capacity, project and programme management capabilities); and
  • limited or no relevant metrics (both “lead” and “lag”).

In the context of IT, business cases must be owned by the business, and for any type of investment, used as a living, operational management tool to manage the full life cycle of an investment decision, and supported by the value management practices outlined above.

Again, in the context of IT, as Susan Cramm states in her book, 8 Things We Hate About IT, this will require  a significant  realignment of roles, responsibilities and accountabilities related to IT. There must be a partnership in which:

  • The IT function moves from providing infrastructure to being a broker of services (both internal and external – and increasingly external) while retaining responsibility and accountability related to fiduciary, economies of scale and enabling infrastructure;
  • Business units accept responsibility for defining the requirements for, meaningful use of, and value creation from these services; and
  • The IT function, as a trusted partner, helps the business:
    • Optimize value from existing services;
    • Understand the opportunities for creating and sustaining business value that are both shaped and  enabled by current, new or emerging technologies;
    • Understand the scope of business change required to realize value from those opportunities (including changes to the business model, business processes, people skills and competencies, reward systems, technology, organizational structure, physical facilities, etc.; and
    • Evaluate, prioritize, select and execute those opportunities with the highest potential value such that value is maximized.

The challenge here is not a lack of proven value management practices – it is the “knowing – doing gap”, as described by Jeffrey Pfeffer and Robert Sutton in their book of the same name. We know what to do, and (should know) how to do it. Yet, so far, here has simply been little or no appetite for, or commitment to the behavioural change required to get it done, and stick with it.

The cost in money wasted and, more importantly, benefits and value lost, eroded or destroyed is appalling. It’s way past time to move beyond word to action – the status quo is not an option!

There is a better way!

The Siren Call of Certainty

In Greek mythology, the sirens were three bird-women who lured nearby sailors with their enchanting music and voices to shipwreck on the rocky coast of their island. The term siren call, from which this derives, is described in the Free Dictionary, as “the enticing appeal of something alluring but potentially dangerous”. In today’s increasingly complex and interconnected world, it is the siren call of certainty that is luring many organizations into failures akin to shipwrecks, particularly, although not limited to their increasingly significant investments in IT-enabled change. More accurately, it is their failing to recognize, accept and manage uncertainty, that leads to these wrecks.

Yet again here, what we have is a failure of governance, and of management – a failure that starts with how strategic decisions are made. In a recent McKinsey paper, How CFOs can keep strategic decisions on track, the authors make the point that “When executives contemplate strategic decisions, they often succumb to the same cognitive biases we all have as human beings, such as overconfidence, the confirmation bias, or excessive risk avoidance.” My discussion here covers the first two (excessive risk avoidance essentially being the opposite of these, and equally dangerous). Executives are often so certain about  (overconfident in) what they want to do that others are unwilling to question their certainty or, if they do, they are dismissed as “naysayers” (and quickly learn not to question again) or the executive only chooses to hear those parts of what they say that confirm their certainty (confirmation bias). I must admit that I have probably been guilty of this myself, in language if, hopefully, not intent, when I have told my teams, “I don’t want to hear why we can’t do this, I want to hear how we can do it.” What I really should have added explicitly was “…and then tell me under what conditions it might not work”.

To resist the lure of the siren call, we require an approach to strategic decision-making  that is open to challenge – one in which multiple lenses are brought to bear on the decision, where uncertainties, and points of view contradictory to those of the person making the final decision, be that the CEO or whoever, are discussed, and where individual biases weigh less in the final decision than facts.

I am not suggesting here that uncertainties should prevent investments being approved, if they did we would never do anything. I am saying that they should not be buried or ignored – they must be surfaced, recognized, mitigated where possible, and then monitored and managed throughout the life-cycle of the investment. This means acknowledging that both the expected outcomes of an investment, and the way those outcomes are realized will likely change during the investment life-cycle. It means managing a changing journey to a changing destination. Unfortunately, once again the siren call of certainty also gets in the way of this.

When investments are approved they are usually executed and managed as projects, all too often seen as technology projects (I use the term broadly here). In a 2010 California Management Review article, “Lost Roots: How Project Management Came to Emphasize Control Over Flexibility and Novelty”, authors Sylvain Lenfle and Christoph Loch, discuss the history of Project Management, and suggest that the current approach to Project Management promises, albeit rarely delivers, greater cost and schedule control, but assumes that uncertainty can be limited at the outset.”

The origins of “modern” project management (PM) can be traced to the Manhattan Project, and the techniques developed during the ballistic missile projects. The article states that “the Manhattan and the first ballistic missile projects…did not even remotely correspond to the ‘standard practice’ associated with PM today…they applied a combination of trial-and-error and parallel trials in order to [deal with uncertainty and unforeseen circumstances] and achieve outcomes considered impossible at the outset”. This approach started to change in the early ’60s when the focus gradually changed from ‘performance at all costs’ to one of optimizing the cost/performance ratio. Nothing inherently wrong with that, but along came Robert McNamara who reorganized the planning process in the Department of Defense (DoD) to consolidate two previously separate processes – planning and budgeting. This integration was supported by the Program Planning and Budgeting System (PBS), which emphasized up-front analysis, planning and control of projects. Again, nothing inherently wrong with that, but the system resulted in an emphasis on the complete definition of the system before its development in order to limit uncertainty, and a strict insistence on a phased “waterfall” approach. The assumptions underlying this approach are i) as decisions taken by top management are not up for discussion, the PM focus is on delivery, and ii) rigorous up-front analysis can eliminate and control uncertainty – these underlying assumptions are still very much part of Project Management “culture” today.

Again, I am not saying here that there is no need for sound analysis up-front – quite the contrary, I believe that we need to do much more comprehensive and rigorous up-front analysis. What I am saying is that, no matter how good the up-front analysis is, things will change as you move forward, and there will be unexpected, and sometime unpredictable surprises. We cannot move blindly ahead to the pre-defined solution, not being open to any questioning of the outcome (destination) or approach (journey), and focusing solely on controlling cost and schedule. The history of large projects is littered with wrecks because, yes, there was inadequate diligence up-front, but equally, or even more so, because we failed to understand and manage uncertainty – forging relentlessly on until at some stage, the project was cancelled, or, more often, success was re-defined and victory declared.

The article suggests that “Project Management has confined itself in an ‘order taker niche’ of carrying out tasks given from above…cutting itself off from strategy making…and innovation”. Many organizations, particularly those embracing agile development approaches, do apply a combination of trial-and-error and parallel trials in order to deal with uncertainty and unforeseen circumstances, and to achieve outcomes either considered impossible at the outset, or different from those initially expected. But, as the authors say, “these actions happen outside the discipline of project management…they apply [these approaches] despite their professional PM training.”

The tragedy here, with both strategic decision making, and execution is that we know how to do much better, and resources exist to help us do so. Strategic decision making can be significantly improved by employing Benefits Mapping techniques to ensure clarity of the desired outcomes, define the full scope of effort to achieve those outcomes, surface assumption, risks and uncertainties around their achievement, and provide a road-map for execution, supporting decision making with an effective business case process, and by applying the discipline of Portfolio Management to both proposed and approved investments. The successful execution of investments in the portfolio can be increased by moving beyond the traditional Project Management approach by taking a Program Management view, incorporating all the delivery projects that are both necessary and sufficient to achieve the desired outcomes in comprehensive programs of change. Many of the elements of such an approach were initially discussed in The Information Paradox, and subsequently codified in the Val IT™ 2.0 Framework.

We know the problem, we have the tools to deal with it – what is still missing is the appetite and commitment to do so.

The Future of IT

After another couple of month’s silence precipitated by some minor surgery, the holiday season and, quite frankly, too much “same old – same old” news, a couple of articles have caused me to, once again, put my fingers to the keyboard.

The first, a blog – unfortunately his last with CIO.com, by Thomas Wailgum, IT in 2020: Will it Even Exist?, and the second by Marilyn Weinstein, again in CIO.com, The Power of IT Drives Businesses Forward. While the two titles might appear contradictory, I felt they were both saying the same thing in somewhat different ways, and that what they were saying is important – although not new.

In describing a new report from Forrester Research, “IT’s Future in the Empowered Era: Sweeping Changes in the Business Landscape Will Topple the IT Status Quo”, Thomas suggests that the question that lingers throughout the report is whether corporate IT, as we know it today, will even exist in 2020.

In the report, analysts Alex Cullen and James Staten identify three forces bearing down on IT that will likely have long-lasting ramifications. The three forces include: Business-ready, self-service technology (including cloud and SaaS adoption); empowered, tech-savvy employees who don’t think they need corporate IT; and a “radically more complex business environment,” notes the report.

Cullen and Staten write “The IT status quo will collapse under these forces, and a new model–empowered BT [business technology]–will take its place. Today’s IT and business leaders should prepare by rethinking the role the IT department plays and how technology staff engage the business, shifting from controlling to teaching and guiding.”

Well, whether it be these three forces or others, I certainly agree that the status quo is unacceptable and this rethink needs to take place – it should have taken place a long time ago.

In her article, Marilyn echoes a comment I have been making for well over a decade in saying “One of the most overused terms I’ve heard in the past few years as CEO of an IT consulting and staffing firm has to be the word “alignment.” With IT embedded in just about everything that we do, it is ridiculous. and dangerous, to continue to talk about alignment. As Marilyn goes on to say, “IT drives efficiencies. IT enables business. IT powers business success. The goal is not merely to align, but to get in front of the business goals and spearhead growth… IT does drive and enable business. It’s time for IT leadership to drive that point home. ” Again, the long overdue need for IT and business leaders to rethink the role the IT department plays and how technology staff engage the business.

The role of the IT leader, the CIO is indeed changing, or certainly should be. The CIO is accountable for delivering required technology services at an affordable cost with an acceptable level of risk. The business leadership is accountable for investing in, and managing and using technology such that it creates and sustains value for their organization – this cannot be abdicated to the IT function. But nor can it be done without the IT function – they have a key role to play here. The CIO, as the IT leader, is responsible for ensuring that their team works in partnership with other business leadership to help them:

  • optimize value from existing services;
  • understand the opportunities for business change enabled by current, new or emerging technologies;
  • understand the business changes they will have to make to realize value from these opportunities; and
  • select opportunities with highest potential value and execute such that value is maximized.

This requires moving beyond the current culture of delivery – based on a philosophy of “build it and they will come”, to a culture of value. This will further require moving beyond the current approach to IT governance – one that is again focused on delivery and the “factory” to a broader more strategic approach to enterprise governance – one that ensures that organizations have:

1. A shared understanding what constitutes value for the organisation;

2. Clearly defined roles, responsibilities and accountabilities, with an aligned reward system;

3. Processes and practices around value management, including portfolio, programme and project management, supported by complete and comprehensive business cases, with active benefits and change management; and

4. Relevant metrics, both “lead” and “lag”.

The Val IT Framework 2.0™ provides, in Section 6 – Functional Accountabilities and Responsibilities, a summary of the roles of IT and business leadership required to support this approach.

In the Afterword of the revised edition of The Information Paradox, I introduced a Strategic Governance Framework. Since that time, as well as working with ISACA in leading the development of The Val IT Framework, I have continued to refine that framework into what I now refer to as the Strategic Enterprise Governance Framework. Over the next few months, I will be introducing this framework, and describing each of the ten major elements that it comprises.

Moving to such a governance approach is a business imperative, one which is itself a major change programme that will take time to plan and implement, and also for the benefits to be achieved. We will not however come anywhere near realizing the full potential value of IT-enabled change until we do so. It is time to move beyond words and place an emphasis on action. This will require strong leadership, and engagement and involvement at every level of the organisation.

Helping Businesses Help Themselves

This morning, I spent little over an hour listening to Susan Cramm on the above live HBR webcast. I always enjoy what Susan has to say. She is a former CIO and CFO who definitely “gets it” when it comes to enterprises realizing value from IT-enabled change.

My takeaways – not new but very much reinforcing – from Susan’s webcast, which was based on her book “8 Things We Hate About IT” and the study which it describes, are that:

  1. It’s time to align authority and accountability for IT – in that the same way that we don’t expect the HR function to manage all our people, or the finance function to manage all our finances, we shouldn’t abdicate (my word) accountability for the intelligent (my word again) use of IT to the IT function.
  2. This means we need to re-architect our IT capabilities – key points being business leaders going from being “IT-dumb” (as the study reports 75% are today) to IT-smart, moving beyond thinking of IT as an organizational function to IT as a business asset, and moving beyond oversight to accountability, i.e. acknowledging their decision “obligations” (again, my word).
  3. The IT function should retain responsibility and accountability related to fiduciary, economies of scale and enabling infrastructure, while the business units must accept responsibility and accountability for delivery.
  4. The IT function stops doing things for the business that the business should be doing for themselves – shifting from an “IT Provides – Business Helps” model to an “IT Helps – Business Provides” model.

Basically, business leaders need to stop thinking of IT as a technology they can leave to IT specialists  to a business asset/tool that they need to manage such that it creates and sustains value for their enterprise and their stakeholders.

While it seems improbable that this has not yet happened, we know, as reinforced by Susan’s study, that this has not happened. From my experience:

  • A CEO told me, not that long ago, that while he knew IT was important, he was much more comfortable focusing on the “core business”. Years – no decades – ago, this might have been OK but today, in most enterprises, IT is embedded in most if not all aspects of the “core business”.
  • When we were developing Val IT 2.0, we added a practice within the VG1 process, Establish Informed and Committed Leadership, that was  VG1.3 Establish a Leadership Forum. The objective of this practice was to “…help the leadership understand and regularly discuss the opportunities that could arise from business change enabled by new or emerging technologies, and to understand their responsibilities in optimising the value created from those opportunities.” I was amazed – and somewhat disheartened – during the review process how many people questioned the need for this practice.
  • There is a consultant living just over the water from me who facilitates CEO forums and has become very successful at it. I approached her to see if we could work together to introduce the topic of CEO responsibilities, and accountabilities related to realizing value from IT or, more specifically IT-enabled change. Her response was “CEOs don’t want to talk about IT – they leave that to their CIOs.”

I am giving a keynote speech in November at the ER 2010 Conference in Vancouver. As I was listening to Susan, I reflected on the work of Steven Alter – a recognized authority in the evolving ER (or, more accurately, conceptual modeling)  space, who says: “IT success isn’t just about IT, it is about the effectiveness of people and organizations – IT usage makes an important difference only when it is part of a work system, and IT success is really about work system success.”

In the same way as the IT function – even if it were willing and capable – cannot be held accountable for the ultimate success of IT-enabled change, they cannot be held accountable for the ultimate success of work systems. They are undoubtedly accountable for delivering the enabling infrastructure, and responsible for working in partnership with the business to help them better understand potential opportunities – and the business responsibilities  and accountabilities related to successfully exploiting those opportunities, but cannot be held accountable for their ultimate success.

For this to happen requires significant behavioural change – there is and will continue to be resistance from both business and IT leadership. For this change to happen, we need – as Susan said today to “engage senior leadership in exploring the appropriate role for IT” and, I would add, their role responsibility and accountability in the context of that role. We need that leaderhip forum – an ongoing forum – that we proposed in Val IT 2.0 so that we can get “the right people in the room having the right discussion”.

The response from a number of listeners to the webcast, which is the same as I always get when I present, was “you have given us a lot to think about here.” Yes, we always need to think, but thought must be balanced with action. We have been talking about the role of business leadership related to IT-enabled change for well over a decade now – it’s time to move beyond thinking to action!

If you missed Susan’s webcast, you can watch a recording at http://s.hbr.org/cR3qlT

Getting Healthcare Right

I have just returned from a trip to Australia where I gave a keynote speech at the HIC 2010 Conference in Melbourne. I also had a number of other meetings and workshops while in Australia. most around the topic of healthcare and, more specifically, eHealth.

Those of you who read this blog will know that my primary passion is around value – specifically enterprises realizing value from IT-enabled change. What you may not know is that there are two areas where I have worked in the past, and continue to work, where I believe IT-enabled change has enormous potential to deliver real value, including social value – but they have as yet come nowhere near to doing so. These are healthcare and education.

Staying with healthcare, and resisting the temptation to further lambaste the UK NHS’s National Program for IT in Health (NPfIT), my experience, and a review of case studies from a number of countries, reveals two disturbing common features among them. These are:

  1. Much is said about the biggest challenge in realizing benefits/value from major IT-enabled change programs in Healthcare (often lumped under the eHealth umbrella)  being management of change – process and behavioural change – yet little or no guidance is provided on how to manage that change, or even what the major elements of change are; and
  2. Benefits are usually treated as an afterthought, often not well defined let alone evaluated until years into the program.

Basically, the approach appears to be: let’s get the technology implemented first, then we’ll find out what changes are required to “meaningfully use” the technology, then we’ll worry about the benefits. As long as we continue with this technology first approach, we will continue to fall dismally short of realizing the potential benefits of such change – the waste of money is a scandal – the opportunity cost of not delivering on the value promise is even worse. We must move from starting with the technology to “starting with the end in mind”.

Over the last few months, I have been involved in working on a number of case studies of enterprises who have made significant progress in implementing value management practices and developing a “value culture”. In preparing my speech to the HIC conference, I drew on the factors that I found to be common in the success of these enterprises – factors that I believe should be seriously considered in the healthcare context. They include:

  • Shifting the focus beyond technology, activities and cost to focus on change – process and behavioural change, outcomes and value
  • Strong and committed business leadership – change programs must be owned by the business and the business must be held accountable for the benefits of those programs
  • Appropriate business engagement and sponsorship/ownership – change cannot be done to people – it must be done with them
    • Cascading sponsorship – there must be leadership at all levels in the enterprise – this should include “formal” leadership, those appointed to lead, and “informal” leadership, those selected/looked to by their peers as leaders
    • “Front-line”  input and feedback – these are the people who usually know what needs to be done, their voice is all too often not heard
  • Clearly defined governance structure, role and responsibilities
  • Don’t underestimate the emotional and political issues around “behavioural change”
  • Be prepared to change course – both the journey and the destination
  • A strong front-end planning process with inclusive and challenging stakeholder engagement
    • Get “the right people in the room having the right discussion”
    • Use Benefits mapping workshops
      • Build clarity and shared understanding of desired outcomes
        • Recognize and balance/optimize different views of value
      • Surface “assumptions masquerading as facts”
      • Surface, understand and manage complexity – understand the full scope of effort including changes to the business model, business processes, roles and responsibilities, skills and competencies, reward systems, technology. organization structure, facilities and management of change
      • Don’t treat  as a one-time event – revisit regularly through an ongoing process
    • Avoid the “big bang” approach – break work into “do-able” chunks that deliver measurable value
  • Define, develop and maintain standard and complete business cases
    • Clearly defined outcomes
    • Full scope of effort
    • Clearly defined – and accepted – accountabilities (for outcomes – not activities)
    • Relevant metrics, both “lead” and “lag”  – “less is more” – measure what’s important and manage what you measure
  • An aligned and results-based reward system
  • A clear and transparent portfolio management process to select and optimize investments in IT-enabled change
  • Manage the journey
    • Use the updated business case as a management tool
    • A strong gating process for progressive commitment of resources
      • When things are not going to plan, understand why and be prepared to change course, change the destination or cancel the program
  • Manage and sustain the change
    • On-going inclusive two-way communication
    • Support/sustain with one-on-one coaching/mentoring
    • Celebrate and build on success
    • Learn and share

All investments in IT-enabled change are important, but few have such impact on all of us as  those in healthcare (and, I would add, education). We cannot continue to muddle through with technology-centric approaches that are designed to fail. We must learn from past failures. There is a better way. Starting with the end in mind, with strong ownership and leadership, inclusive engagement, and pro-active management of change – managing the destination and the journey – we can do better. We must do better. We deserve no less!

Value Management is not just a challenge for IT

I had the opportunity to deliver the closing keynote to the APM Benefits Management SIG Annual Conference at the National Motorcycle Museum in Birmingham, UK on Tuesday – from my home office in Victoria on Vancouver Island in BC, Canada (the view from which you can see below).
Slide1
The purpose of this blog is not to dwell on the technology that allowed me to do so – which has both advantages (in terms of not having to travel) and disadvantages (in terms of audience engagement and feedback) but to share some thoughts that I got from listening to the presentation that preceded my keynote. The presentation was entitled “Benefits in the Built Environment” and given by Matthew Walker.

Matthew defined the “Built Environment” as being “output centric” and relating to infrastructure programmes in the communications, energy, transportation, waste and water sectors. Within the UK context – and indeed any nation – these are often taken for granted – only thought about when they break – but are of strategic importance in terms of providing an economic backbone, having national security and quality of life implications and impact, and requiring sustainability targets. Investment in these sectors in the UK 2005/6 to 2009/10 has been ~£30b/yr and is currently projected to be ~£50b/yr in 2010/11 and to continue at that level until 2030, with the current drivers for investment in these areas being the economic situation, population growth and carbon reduction. Rising to this challenge requires diversification of investment methods and the political will and capability to make long-term investments. To deliver value for money, this will require prioritization of desired outcomes, and understanding of interdependency’s through effective benefits management, or – in my preferred terminology – value management. Does this sound familiar? This is what we have been talking about in the context of IT – or IT-enabled change programmes – for well over a decade or more! It gets even more familiar.

The track record of benefits management for such infrastructure investments – if you go beyond schedule, cost, and delivery to specification is largely unknown, but the indicators are not good. A 2009 APM report, “Change for the better. A Study on Benefits Management across the UK”, found that >60% of organizations had no more than an informal or incidental approach to benefits management, and ~70% felt that value was added only some of the time, or never.

Matthew’s recommendations included:

  • defining success in terms of benefits;
  • putting benefits management at the heart of oversight and governance of major programmes and projects;
  • increasing awareness and exposure of the business case;
  • using benefits management to prioritize investments; and
  • providing transparency through assurance.

Matthew stressed that achieving such a “benefits renaissance” would not be an “overnight journey”, but one that we must take – the “we” in this case including:

  • funders;
  • professional bodies;
  • business executives; and
  • construction industry practitioners.

I have long said that the issues around realizing value from IT investments or, more accurately investments in IT-enabled change, are not an IT issue but a business issue – a business issue that is not unique to IT. They are a symptom of our preoccupation with cost, activities and outputs, and our failure to move beyond this preoccupation to a focus on value – understanding the desired outcomes of an investment, and the full scope of interdependent effort required to deliver these outcomes, assigning clear accountability for outcomes – supported by relevant metrics and an aligned reward system, and designing and managing complete and comprehensive programmes to deliver those outcomes. Only when we do this – which will require significant behavioural change – will we  address “the challenge of value”,  and begin to consistently create and sustain value  for all stakeholders, including shareholders in the private sector, and taxpayers in the public sector. In today’s complex and rapidly changing economic environment, to quote from “Apollo 13”, “Failure is not an option!” Or, to quote General Erik Shinseki, a former Chief of Staff of the US Army, “If you don’t like change, you’re going to like irrelevance even less!

Addressing the Behavioural Challenges

In my previous post, Behavioural Change – The Crux of the Value Challenge, I suggested that we don’t need any more frameworks – there is no shortage of books, frameworks, methods, techniques, tools etc. to address the effective governance and management of IT and the use of IT to create and sustain value. It is the adoption of these that is painfully slow. It is human behaviour – or rather our inability to change it –  that is at the core of the challenge. I am currently working – both individually and with others – on a number of initiatives around the need to change how we think, manage, and act – to change behaviour – both individual and group behaviour – from the Boardroom to the front-line.

I also said that I would be looking for ways to broaden the dialogue and to engage with practitioners who are wrestling with these issues on a daily basis. My silence on the blog front has largely been the result of my being engaged with a number of individuals and groups in this space, including a quick trip to Europe and the UK last week, where I met and talked with a number of enterprises – some of whom have been on this value journey for 10 years or more. These discussions, and subsequent reflection, have crystallized a number of thoughts in my mind. These include:

  1. A critical factor in determining success or failure of value management is the presence or absence of a clear owner of the value management issue or process.
  2. The “tipping point” – when value management practices start to get traction and become embedded in enterprises – is when the executive and senior management move beyond awareness and understanding of the issue to commitment to action – beyond “talking the talk” to “walking the talk”. This is illustrated in the figure below (figure and text below is adapted from The Information Paradox). Slide1At the thinking, or cognitive level, we recognize and become aware of a need to change. This often translates itself fairly rapidly into talk: “We at Thorp Inc. have to make fundamental changes to our organization.” All too often, the nature of those changes is not understood, and the definition of them is delegated, or more accurately abdicated. The reaction to this is often “This too will pass,” and all too often, it does. It is only when we wake up at three in the morning, reaching for the antacid, as we feel our stomach churning with the realization of the implications of the change and the breadth and depth of what has to change, that we begin to reach understanding. This is the precursor to commitment. The bottom line here is that we can only “walk our talk” when we fully understand what we are saying. Treating the implementation or improvement of value management practices as an organizational change programme – which it is – the use of some form of benefits modeling, which is discussed later, can bring you to an earlier awakening. When we have the understanding necessary to build commitment, to understand the full extent of what we are committing to, then, and only then, are we ready to act. Even then, we can act only if we have the resource capability and capacity to do so.
  3. Those enterprises that have passed this “tipping point” have been able to effectively apply value management practices to guide informed and intelligent decision-making during the current economic crisis – those that haven’t generally fell back to “old ways” with often across the board cost cuts.
  4. Value management practices are most effective when they are closely integrated with, and part of the business planning process. Going beyond this, they are most effective when they are integrated with overall enterprise governance.
  5. Incremental approaches to implementing and improving value management practices are more successful than  “big bang” ones.
  6. The areas of value management that appear to provide the greatest improvement in value management practices and outcomes are:
    1. Improving the business case process; and
    2. Taking the portfolio view.
  7. The factors that continue to constrain effective adoption of value management practices include:
    1. Failing to define, accept or put rigour into accountability for performance; and
    2. Clearly related to the above, failure to align the reward system such that there are consequences – both positive and negative.
  8. The interventions that appear to have been the most successful in changing behaviours, and helping enterprises move beyond awareness and understanding to commitment and action include:
    1. Inclusive engagement of all the stakeholders through workshops (for more on engagement, see The Challenge of Business Engagement);
    2. Use of benefits modeling techniques in workshops to get everyone “on the same page” – building a broader base of understanding of, and support for value management, including the need for business cases with clear accountability, relevant metrics and an aligned reward system;
    3. One-on-one coaching, and
    4. Active and on-going executive and senior management involvement where they are seen to be “walking the talk”.

In preparation for a workshop with one of the groups I am working with, I put together a short survey with the objective of:

  • Understanding the current and target levels of maturity related to value management (based on  the Value Governance [VG] domain high-level maturity model in ISACA‘s Val IT™ Framework 2.0.);
  • Understanding how long it has taken to reach the current level of maturity, and how long it is anticipated to take to reach the target level;
  • Identifying the factors that have either supported or constrained adoption, and to what extent they have done so;
  • Identifying interventions and the extent to which they have enabled adoption; and
  • Understanding the organizational context of the responding enterprise (optional).

Again, in the interests of broadening the dialogue, I would like to extend this survey to a broader audience. The survey is targeted at individuals who are involved in improving value management practices, including, but not limited to some or all of: leadership behaviour; process implementation and adoption (including business cases, portfolio, programme management and project management); roles, responsibilities and accountabilities (for both supply and demand); organizational structure (including Investment Decision Boards, and Value / Portfolio / Programme / Project Management Offices); information requirements (including metrics and reporting); and supporting tools (data collection, analysis and reporting).

You can access the survey here. The survey should not take much more than 10 mins to complete. The survey has 3 pages, and contains 10 questions.  Questions regarding “Current and target maturity levels”, and “Constraints to adoption and interventions to address” must be answered, but answers to “Organizational Context” questions are optional. Assuming that I get enough responses to yield a meaningful result, I will post results on this site in a later post. All information will be aggregated, and specific information about your organization, if provided, will be treated as confidential and will not be published without your express permission.

One of the challenges that we all have in trying to implement or improve value management practices is the perceived – and indeed real – enormity of the task. As per one of my observations above, this is why an incremental – and often pragmatic and opportunistic – approach is required. The business case, as discussed in an earlier post Lies, Damn Lies, and Business Cases, is the foundation on which all else is built, and, as such, sows the seeds of success or failure. Portfolio management is a powerful tool but if it is populated with “toxic” business cases, it will only give the illusion of progress. This is leading me to focus my attention on the business case and think about how, through workshops and benefits modeling, supported by one-on- one coaching we can change the view of business cases as a bureaucratic hurdle to be got over and then forgotten to being one of the most powerful tools available – turning it from an enemy to a valuable friend! If we can do this, we will have a solid foundation on which to further improve value management practices.

Behavioral Change – The Crux of the Value Challenge

As we start a new year, it is a time for me to reflect on what has passed, look ahead to what may be, and decide where to focus in 2010.

Not surprisingly, my two most referenced blog tags in 2009 were value and governance. Value because I believe that this is ultimately what everything we do should be about, and should certainly be the desired outcome of any investment, including, but certainly not limited to investment in IT-enabled change. Governance, because effective governance establishes the framework than ensures that management decisions and actions are focused on creating and sustaining value from investments  – through their full life-cycle from ideation to the management and eventual retirement of resulting assets.

I have found myself in many debates about value, including whether value is as or more important than cost or risk, or whether value implies financial and ignores intangibles. The Val IT ™ framework cuts through this debate by defining  value as “total life cycle benefits net of total life cycle costs adjusted for risk and (in the case of financial value) the time value of money”, and recognizing that benefits can be financial or non-financial. I prefer the term non-financial here to intangible as this can imply that the benefit cannot be measured. My definition of an intangible benefit is one whose contribution to value we have not yet learned to measure.

When it comes to governance, we must move beyond IT governance which perpetuates the separation between two solitudes of IT and the business. With IT embedded in just about everything we do, and becoming increasingly more so, we need to view governance of IT as an integral part of strategic enterprise governance – not a separate afterthought. We need to move away from simply talking about IT – which implies the technology alone – to IT-enabled change. IT in and of itself delivers no value – it is indeed a commodity and a cost. It  is how the business uses IT as a tool, to enable or, increasingly, to shape organizational change that actually creates or sustains value for the enterprise. The implication of this is that we will come nowhere near realizing the potential value of IT-enabled change until we have effective governance with appropriate engagement, ownership and accountability from business leadership – governance that encompasses the full life-cycle of an investment decision, including the original investment and the resulting assets.

My thoughts around what is going to take to get such effective governance include:

  1. We need to shift the focus of governance to value.
  2. Value does not come from technology itself (in this regard I would question the 2009 Capgemini Global CIO Report that assigns 20% of value to the technology) – it comes from how people use the information that technology “provides”. I have said in the past and continue to believe that information and people are the most important yet under-utilized/leveraged assets in any enterprise.
  3. While the awareness (I would not go as far as saying understanding) of executives and business management of the importance of IT is certainly (in words at least) increasing they still generally abdicate responsibility and accountability for realizing value from IT to the IT function.
  4. It may be useful here to explore the parallels (or not) with the HR function. Like IT, HR is pervasive and people are embedded in all of what an enterprise does yet, while the HR function sets HR policies and ensures compliance with laws and regulations, management of HR is recognized as the responsibility and accountability of line management – not abdicated to the HR function. This does not necessarily mean that it is done well but the responsibility and accountability are accepted.
  5. Most of today’s CIOs are not capable of fulfilling the role that has been abdicated to them or even of building the bridges that are necessary to develop the partnership with the business that is essential to move forward – many probably (again, despite what they might say) don’t want, or are not willing to do so. A recent BCS poll  identified the top 10 critical topics for CIOs, 8 of which could be addressed by adopting the principles, processes and practices contained in frameworks such as Val IT, but a leading CIO Group took the attitude that whilst they might be critical issues, they are intractable and will be with us for the next decade at least or until something traumatic happens to shake the Executive Suite into taking notice.
  6. We don’t need any more frameworks – there is no shortage of books, frameworks, methods, techniques, tools etc. to address the effective governance and management of IT and the use of IT to create and sustain value – it is the adoption of these that is painfully slow.
  7. In The Information Paradox, we talked about the need to change how we think, manage, and act – to change behaviour – both individual and group behaviour – from the Boardroom to the front-line. While recognizing this need, the years since the book was published have shown that we seriously underestimated the challenge this would present. This is where we now need to focus our efforts.

Behaviours do not happen in isolation – they are both influenced by and influence other factors. We need to look at a continuum of behaviour, the characteristics of behaviour – specifically expectations and constraints, how these change as complexity increases, and the role of technology in all of this. Human behaviour is at the core of the issue we are dealing with here.

  • Human behaviour is a continuum from individual behaviour through group behaviour (where groups can be families, committees, organizations, communities, industries, countries, regions, societies, etc.).
  • At any level, there are both expectations and constraints (habits, norms,…).
  • The larger (number of individuals), and more distributed (breadth of the network) the group, the more complex this issue becomes.
  • Technology, by increasingly operating across and breaking down physical constraints (geography, distance, time, etc.) has (exponentially) increased this complexity (of what is sometimes called the “ecosystem”).
  • Slide1Paradoxically, with the advances in technology it is becoming simpler to introduce more complexity more quickly. As illustrated in the figure below, technology creates greater expectations while at the same time requiring increasingly significant changes to behavioural habits, or norms if those expectations are to be met – all this within an increasingly complex and interdependent “ecosystem”.

In discussing the issue of complexity with a colleague, he reminded my of the words of Thomas Homer-Dixon in The Ingenuity Gap in which he says “Looking back from the year 2100, we’ll see a period when our creations – technological, social ecological – outstripped our understanding and we lost control of our destiny. And we will think: if only – if only we’d had the ingenuity and will to prevent some of that. I am convinced that there is still time to muster that ingenuity – but the hour is late.” While he was talking of loftier issues, the words ring true here also. We need to explore these behavioural challenges and, in doing so, to attempt to provide answers (or at least some insights) to the following questions:

  1. How far can we realistically move value management – including measurement and attribution of benefits – from an art to a science? (I have believed and stated for a long time that it is a total waste of time to try to get too specific/accurate about attribution where – as there usually are – there are many sources of contribution. I think that it is however very important to be explicit about assumptions that are being made and the nature of the expected contribution such that indicators can be identified which can then be tracked to validate (or otherwise) the thinking behind the assumptions and the contribution.) How long should we realistically expect this to take?
  2. What are the individual and group behaviours that both constrain and, possibly, determine how far we can go towards value management (et al) as a science? (Some/much of this revolves around understanding and acceptance of responsibility and accountability – and, possibly the prevailing “culture of blame” – as well as learning from both unsuccessful AND successful investments).
  3. What are the external factors that further influence these behaviours, e.g. boom times vs. bust times, national and industry cultures, leadership styles, etc. and how do they influence the behaviour? (This raises a further question: “To what extent is there a/one “right way” of doing this?”)
  4. What interventions can positively change these behaviours?

I am currently working on a number of initiatives around these questions, both individually and with others, I will be talking about these more over the course of the year. Beyond talking, I will also be looking for ways to broaden the dialogue and to engage with practitioners who are wrestling with these issues on a daily basis.

Reflections on SIMposium09

I had the opportunity to attend and speak at SIMposium09 in Seattle last week. As Seattle is a great town and close to Victoria,  I took the opportunity to take Diane and we both enjoyed Seattle and spent a few very relaxing “Internet-free” days at the wonderful Lake Quinalt Lodge on the Olympic Peninsula after the conference. Having now had time to reflect on the conference, I offer a summary of my thoughts (and in doing so, draw on a number of my earlier posts).

Introducing the sessions on Tuesday, the Moderator, Julia King, Executive Editor of Computerworld, said that what she had taken away from the conference up to that point were three things – people, process and productivity. While productivity – specifically doing more with less – was a common theme, and there was considerable emphasis on people and some on process, I would expand on this somewhat. From what I heard, both through formal presentations, and in informal discussions, the things that I left thinking about, and which I will expand on below were – value (including but not limited to productivity), leadership, innovation (where I would include process), people, and change (specifically management of strategic change). I will talk a bit more about each of these below.

Value

It should come as no surprise that this is my first point. I was pleased that a number of sessions did focus on value, and it was mentioned to varying degrees in others. I was however disappointed when Jerry Luftman presented the results of the 2009 SIM IT trend survey that the word was not mentioned in any of the top ten CIO issues. In fairness, I do understand that in order to plot trends, there has to be some consistency in questions year over year. While it could be argued that the “alignment” question may be a proxy for value (although many people told me they never wanted to hear this question again), and that it is implied in others – I believe we have to make value explicit and  put it front and centre. Certainly, productivity is one aspect of value, but only one aspect – one that tends to focus on doing more with less, and by inference cost. In The Information Paradox, we talked about 3 aspects of value: alignment (NOT the infamous “Aligning IT with the business” topic which, in my mind, makes about as much sense as talking about “aligning our heart with our body”, but rather ensuring that investments are aligned with the enterprise’s strategic objectives); financial worth (which I now refer to as business worth including both financial and non-financial aspects); and risk (both delivery risk and benefits risk).  The Val IT ™ framework further defines value as “total life cycle benefits net of total life cycle costs adjusted for risk and (in the case of financial value) the time value of money”. We need to shift the discussion from the cost of technology to the value of the business change that it enables. We need to create a culture of value in our enterprises.

Leadership

A quick scan of the agenda shows that this was by far the most prevalent topic – not surprising given SIM’s target constituency. There is absolutely no denying that we need more and better leadership – but what do we mean by that? Are we talking about grooming those few who will rise to the corner offices in the top floor of corporate HQ, or are we/should we be talking about something beyond that?  A former colleague of mine, Don Tapscott, used to say (may still say) that “leadership can come from anywhere”. I have been thinking for a while about the “cult of leadership” – in his book, The Wisdom of CrowdsJames Surowiecki identifies one of the challenges is that we put too much faith in individual leaders or experts, either because of their position or track record and that these individuals also become over-confident in their abilities. I don’t want to question the ability and competence of all leaders or experts – while I certainly have seen my share of bad ones, most are good people doing the best they can. However, in today’s increasingly complex and fast-paced knowledge economy, much of which is both enabled by and driven by technology, it is unrealistic to expect individuals, however good they are, to have all the answers, all the time. The reality is that neither position nor past success is any guarantee of future success.

If organisations are to succeed in today’s knowledge economy, they cannot constrain themselves to the knowledge of a few individuals – to put it a more brutal way, they cannot be constrained by the habits or ego(s) of their leader(s)! Organisations must tap into the collective knowledge of all their people – retaining appropriate accountability, based on the law of subsidiarity – an organizing principle that matters ought to be handled by the smallest, lowest or least centralized competent authority. This means locating accountability and decision-making at the most appropriate level, while supporting decisions with broader and more knowledgeable input.

Innovation

We hear a lot about innovation and the potential for CIOs to become Chief Innovation Officers. Interestingly, a number of recent surveys show that executive leadership is disappointed with the lack of innovative ideas from CIOs. But what is innovation? The Oxford Dictionary defines innovation as [t0] bring in new methods, ideas etc. often followed by making change. All too often, we believe that innovation requires new technologies. In a recent Entrepreneur article, Tim O’Reilly, who launched the first commercial website, coined the term “Web 2.0” and was instrumental in the popularization of open-source software, isn’t buying the hype: He calls the era of the I-word “dead on arrival.” “If it is innovative, everybody will know,” O’Reilly says. “Adding words to it does not help.” The current “innovation” overload is the result of folks who don’t know what true invention is trying to pass themselves off as trailblazers. He’s seen companies throw away great ideas because it wasn’t immediately obvious how to make money from them. Then smaller companies and entrepreneurs would come along and play with the idea, just because they’re passionate about it. And they would be the ones to unlock the idea’s potential and grow into the money. While new technologies do indeed enable new methods and ideas, they are not necessary for innovation. Innovation is equally powerful, and often easier, by simply coming up with new and creative ways of using existing technologies.

People

Ultimately, it is people who lead, people who innovate, and, as a result, people who create value. Over the last few decades, much has been said and written about empowering the people within an enterprise – unfortunately little of that talk and writing has translated into reality. As James Surowiecki says, “Although many companies play a good game when it comes to pushing authority away from the top, the truth is that genuine employee involvement remains an unusual phenomenon.” As a result of this, information flows – up, down and across organisations – are poor, non-existent or “filtered” in all directions, decisions are made by a very few with inadequate knowledge and information, and there is limited buy-in to whatever decisions are made. As Peter Senge says in The Fifth Discipline Fieldbook , “…under our old system of governance, one can lead by mandate. If you had the ability to climb the ladder, gain power and then control that power, then you could enforce…changes…Most of our leaders don’t think in terms of getting voluntary followers, they think in terms of control.” I should add here, based on Monday’s closing keynote “It’s about the People”, given by Bill Baumann, Vice President of Information Technology for REI, that REI does appear to be one enterprise that does understand empowerment.

In this context, although there was not a specific session on the topic, social networking (including Web 2.0 and crowd-sourcing etc.) was discussed in many of the sessions, and in informal discussions. As I have said before, I am becoming increasingly interested in how social networking, rather than being viewed as a potential problem to be managed within the “traditional” view of governance and management – today still largely based on beliefs and structures that are a hundred years old – has enormous potential to revolutionize governance and management. In doing so, we could truly tap in to the experience of all employees (and other stakeholders) – not be limited to the knowledge/experience of those few anointed leaders or experts. This could actually make the much-abused term empowerment mean something by giving people the opportunity to contribute to/participate in decision-making, actually be listened to and, as a result, re-engage and really make a difference.

Change

The challenge facing enterprises today is not implementing technology, although this is certainly not becoming any easier, but implementing IT-enabled organisational change such that value is created and sustained, and risk is known, mitigated or contained. The creation and sustainment of value from innovation requires understanding and effective management of change in how people think, manage and act, i.e. change in human behaviour. Unfortunately, as we were reminded in one session by Jeffrey Barnes and Cheryl White, studies have shown consistently over the last 25 years that the failure rate of strategic change initiatives is between 85-90%. Let’s look at a number of scenarios where such initiatives can come to a premature halt.

The first of these is implementation by fiat, without an adequately thought out plan and commensurate resources. There is all too often a tendency for executives to believe that once they say something should be done it is – this is rarely the case. I sometimes describe this as the “Star Trek school of management”. Executives, just like Captain Picard, say “Make it so!” – they often don’t fully understand what “it” is or how they will know when they get there, and  the people they say it to all run off with very different ideas of what “it” is creating a lot of activity – often in conflicting directions. As Larry Bossidy and Ram Charam suggest in Execution, The Discipline of Getting things Done, the role of the executive when saying “make it so” is to ensure that no-one leaves the room until the executive is confident that they all understand what “it” is and, when they come back with a plan, that they don’t leave the room until he/she is confident that the plan has a good chance of delivering “it”.

In other cases, organisations take on too much in the first bite – this either results in “sticker shock” with no action being taken or, particularly when, as is often the case – especially in the current environment of short-termism – the time-frame is unrealistic, failure. The opposite can also be true, doing too little and/or taking too long to do it such that patience runs out and/or interest diminishes to the point of backing off.

Also, where progress is being made, success is not always promoted and built on – without demonstrated and recognized success it can be very difficult to maintain the interest and attention of executives to sustain the change initiative, especially one that may take many years, as many, if not most such initiatives can do. This can become particularly evident if a new executive comes on the scene and asks “Why are we doing this?” Without a sound response, this is often followed by “We did just fine without this where I came from!”

Many of these scenarios are exacerbated when insufficient thought has been given to metrics – measurements that must include both “lag” metrics – are we there yet? – and “leading” metrics – are we on track to get there?, as well as tangibles and intangibles. As Faisal Hoque, Chairman and CEO of the Business Technology Management Institute says, “…technology [itself] warrants evaluation with a tangible set of measures. But the majority of what technology actually does falls more into the sphere of the intangibles”. Understanding how those intangibles (often lead indicators) can contribute to tangibles (often lag indicators) is a key part of value management.

John Zackman offered another explanation for the challenge of change when positioning enterprise architecture – in the context of the overall enterprise – as being about managing complexity and change (which I very much agree with). John said “If you can’t describe it you can’t build it or change it.” John’s comments raise a number of  interesting questions which I won’t attempt to answer here.  Is it actually possible to “reverse architect” today’s complex global enterprises that have, somewhat like London’s Heathrow airport, grown ad hoc over time without any underlying architectural framework or design? If not, are they doomed to eventually fail? Will new and emerging enterprises take a more disciplined approach or will they follow the same pattern such that the cycle continues?

For more on the topic of change, go to Managing Change – The Key to Realizing Value and The Knowing-Doing Gap.

I will explore some or all of these topics more in subsequent posts.