Bridging the Gap between Value Selling and Value Realization

All enterprises exist to deliver value to their stakeholders. Over the last few decades, the way that we use technology – and who uses it, has changed dramatically. Yet one thing that has not changed is the on-going questioning of the value received from our investments involving technology. As we move into an increasingly digital universe, with technology becoming embedded in everything we do, there has never been a more critical time to address this question

As I have discussed in previous posts – “Partnering for value”, and “The IT Value standoff”, technology per se is just a cost – it is how the business uses technology, and manages the change that technology both shapes and enables, that determines whether the technology contributes to business value.

What has been lost in all this is the understanding of, and accountability for managing the increasing breadth and depth of business change that technology both shapes and enables, and which is required if value is to be created and sustained! We need to change the conversation – to change it from one largely about the cost of delivery of technology to one focused on creating and sustaining value from business change.

Business value will only be realized from our increasingly significant and complex investments in IT-enabled change when complementary changes are made in the business – including changes to the governance, business and operating models, business processes and practices, people’s work, and the skills and competencies required to successfully get the work done, reward and incentive systems, organizational structures, physical facilities etc. And, the most difficult, changes to organizational culture, and group and individual behaviour.

The value journey starts with the sales cycle, and it is here where the seeds of success or failure are first sown. Did you know that:

  • Over 95% of B2B buyers demand proof that the vendor will deliver value, demanding financial justification / ROI quantification prior to purchase approval (IDC)
  • Yet, only 7% of buyers say the vendors’  content and sales reps are value-focused (The Economist).

But, buyers’ concerns don’t end when the sale is made:

  • Recent research from IBM (IBM Strategy & Change, Survey of Fortune 1000 CIO’s) reported that organizations said that 40% of total IT spending brought no return to their organization
  • The Standish Group has reported on the success of “IT projects” annually since 1994, with success factors being: on time, on budge; and delivering the expected features. The 2015 report redefined success as being: on time; on budget; and with a satisfactory result, where satisfactory includes:on-target (% requirements);  satisfied (very high to very low); value (very high to very low); and alignment with strategic corporate goal (precise to distant). They then summarized the outcomes of projects over the last five years using the new definition of success factors, as shown in the table below.

Standish2015

The number of successful projects is relatively unchanged over the 5 years at a dismal 27 – 29%. In fact, in every year since the  report was first published in 1994, the percentage has been close to that range. It is little wonder, given these numbers, that we are seeing an increased concern around value.

As enterprises move into the digital age, if we continue to do things the way we have been, the challenge will only increase:

  • McKinsey, in a recent report (The digital tipping point. McKinsey Global survey results 2014) reported that most organizations have only a basic grasp on the value that digital can create, need to understand better how to match priorities and investments with the areas of highest value, and must work to ensure that their structures and business processes are set up to take full advantage of the opportunities that digital efforts offer.

This is both a challenge and an opportunity for sales professionals. Building  awareness, understanding, and commitment to make the necessary changes should be a joint responsibility of vendors (as well as consultants) and their enterprise clients. This has been the “elephant in the room” for the last 2 – 3 decades, and we will come nowhere near to realizing full business value of these enterprise investments in IT-enabled change is we don’t surface and deal with it.

I have recently been working with a group of sales professionals and consultants in setting up the Value Selling and Realization Council (VSR Council). The proposed charter of the Council is to:

Maximize value from investments in IT-enabled change by establishing, promoting and adopting value management methods, standards, practices, tools, and training that enable B2B solution providers and enterprise corporate executives to collaborate in developing and executing a “roadmap to value” approach, in order to optimize the business outcomes from such investments.

This is an ambitious agenda – one which, if it is to be successful, and not fall into the old “don’t confuse sell with install” mindset, has to address the “elephant in the room” by adding the missing piece between selling value – getting the client to understand the potential value of the proposed investment, and realizing value – the client actually realizing or even exceeding the expected value. This missing piece is enabling value – building the awareness, understanding, and commitment to make the complementary business  changes that are required for value to be realized.

The figure below provides a model of Value Management, and illustrates that a value mindset and supporting structures, processes, roles, responsibilities, and metrics must be established as part of enterprise governance, and that value enablement is a very significant piece of the Value life-cycle – the bridge between selling value and actually realizing it.

Slide3Unfortunately, it is the piece that has been largely ignored, or paid lip service to up till now. This is where the VSR Council has the opportunity to make a real difference, by building a pro-active community of value-focused individuals, including sales professionals, industry analysts, value consultants, and client enterprise professionals and leaders.

The Council is only a few months old, but already boasts a long list of senior level managers from companies such as IDC, SAP, Oracle, Workday, Adobe, Microsoft, Alexander Group, Unisys, Sirius Decisions, Finlistics, Alinean, DecisionLink, IBM, Accenture, JDA, NetApp, EY, KPMG, VMware, Effisoft, etc. Take a few minutes and watch a short video from a few of the founding members (I’m the oldest looking one!).

I attended a first meeting of the Council in Dallas in October. I have to say that I went with some skepticism, not knowing how many people might show up, what their experience might be, how open as competitors they would be with each other, or what their views of value management were – particularly value enablement and realization. By the end of the day, my skepticism had disappeared. We were expecting 15 attendees, and 22 showed up, there was a breadth and depth of understanding of the value space, and a very open discussion, displaying both a broad understanding of the challenges of value management, and a passion to work collaboratively to address them.

As a non-profit, the VSR Council depends upon the time contributions of its members. If  you are  interested in furthering the work of the Council, and “connecting the dots” to value, individual Community membership is free – just click here to register to become a member and join the community. To connect with the community, you can also join the VSR Linkedin Group here. Also, please consider becoming an active member by volunteering yourself or someone working with you on one of the working committees. Help the Council build something great and connect those dots!

A great way to kickstart your involvement in the community is by attending the upcoming VSR Summit, a networking and educational event scheduled for February 29th thru March 1st, 2016 at the Marriott Courtyard DFW North in Grapevine, Texas.  There is a cost to attend and capacity is limited so, if you or anyone else you may know are interested, you should register soon.

We are today at a “tipping point” where, if we are to come anywhere near realizing the full potential of a digital world, we need to connect the dots from ideas to the realization of value. We will not do this with traditional siloed and fragmented disciplines and approaches. The VSR council provides the opportunity to create a professional value management community, connecting those dots, and providing leadership in enabling organizations to create and sustain value from technology-enabled change. I hope that I have the opportunity in the months and years to come to meet and work with many of you in this community to achieve this goal.

Transforming governance and leadership for the digital economy

The digital economy

DE
The digital economy is not primarily about technology, nor is it just about the economy. Yes, it is being shaped and enabled by increasingly significant and rapid technological change. And, yes, it will have significant economic impact. But it is much more than that. It is part of a broader digital revolution. One in which, as in the case of the industrial revolution, we will see seismic shifts not just in technology, but in the nature of our lives, our work, our enterprises – large and small, public and private, and our societies. A shift that will not just change the nature of products and services, and how they are developed and delivered, but also how we govern and manage our lives, work, enterprises and societies.

Technology is becoming embedded in everything we as individuals, enterprises and societies do, and, indeed, we are increasingly becoming embedded in everything technology does. If we are to deliver on the promise of the digital revolution, we have to acknowledge that the way we have governed and managed IT in the past has proven woefully inadequate, and that continuing on this path will be a huge impediment to delivering on that promise. Governance of IT has been a subject of much discussion over the last two decades. Unfortunately, most of the discussion has focused on the technology, the cost of technology, failed IT projects, and generally questioning the value that technology and the IT function deliver to the enterprise. Despite all this discussion, not much has materially or broadly changed over the last 50 years, including:
• An all too often blind focus on the technology itself, rather than the change – increasingly significant and complex change – that technology both shapes and enables;
• The unwillingness of business leaders to get engaged in, and take ownership of this change – preferring to abdicate their accountability to the IT function;
• Failure to inclusively involve the stakeholders affected by the change, without whose knowledge, understanding and “buy in” failure is pretty much a foregone conclusion;
• A lack of rigour at the front-end of an investment decision, including, what is almost universally a totally ineffective business case process;
• Not actively managing for value; and
• Not managing the journey beyond the initial investment decision.

We still have what is predominately a “culture of delivery” – “build it and they will come”, rather than a “culture of value” – one that focuses on creating and sustaining value from an organization’s investments and assets.

We have been having the wrong conversation – we need to change that conversation!

Governance of “IT”

GovernanceTreating IT governance as something separate from overall enterprise governance, labeling and managing investments in IT-enabled business change as IT projects, and abdicating accountability to the CIO are the root cause of the failure of so many to generate the expected payoff. Business value does not come from technology alone – technology in and of itself is simply a cost. Business value comes from the business change that technology both shapes and enables. Change of which technology is only one part – and increasingly only a small part. Technology only contributes to business value when complementary changes are made to the business – including increasingly complex changes to the organizational culture, the business model, and the operating model, as well as to relationships with customers and suppliers, business processes and work practices, staff skills and competencies, reward systems, organizational structures, physical facilities etc. Ultimately, it is people’s intelligent and innovative use of the information captured, organized, distributed, visualized and communicated by technology that creates and sustains value. This is not a technology issue – it is a business issue.

Much of the discussion around the digital economy today is on improving the customer experience – as indeed it should be, although we have been saying the same for decades with, at best, mixed success. We will come nowhere close to achieving this unless we put equal focus on our people, and rethinking how we govern, manage and organize for the digital economy such that we maximize the return on our information and our people.

Surviving and thriving in the digital economy is not an IT governance issue, it is an enterprise governance issue. Successfully navigating the digital economy requires that we change how we govern, lead and manage our enterprises – including, but certainly not limited to IT.

What needs to change?

ChangeIn work I have been doing with Professor Joe Peppard at the European School of Management and Technology in Berlin, we have identified 8 things that business leaders, starting with the CEO, need to do. These are:
1. Don’t see IT as something separate from your core business – technology today is embedded in, and an integral part of most, if not all parts of your business processes.
2. Don’t focus on the technology alone – focus on the value that can be created and sustained through the business change that technology both shapes and enables.
3. Do recognize that you are ultimately accountable for the overall value created by all business change investments – and ensuring that accountability for the realisation of business benefits anticipated from each investment is appropriately delegated to, and accepted by, other executives and managers.
4. Do demand rigorous analysis of every proposed business change investment, whether or not IT is involved. Ensure that you and your team know and can clearly define expected outcomes, that there is a clear understanding of how value is going to be achieved, that all relevant stakeholders have bought in to the required changes, and that they are capable of making or absorbing them and delivering on the expected outcomes.
5. Do recognize that the business case is the most powerful tool that you have at your disposal to manage business change investments – insist on complete and comprehensive business cases, including desired outcomes, benefits, costs and risks, and clear explanation of how each benefit will be achieved with unambiguously assigned accountabilities, supported by relevant metrics.
6. Do recognize that benefits don’t just happen and rarely happen according to plan – outcomes and plans will change – don’t think business case approval is the end of the story. Mandate that the business case be used as the key operational tool to “manage the journey”, updated to reflect relevant changes, and regularly reviewed.
7. Do know if and when it’s time to stop throwing good money after bad, or when there are better uses for the money and “pull the plug.”
8. If your CIO doesn’t “get” the above points, and hasn’t already been talking to you about them, get one who does and will!

Enterprise governance must evolve beyond a model rooted in a culture of delivery (of technical capabilities) to one based on a culture of value – creating and sustaining value from investments and assets. In the context of IT, this means recognizing that we are no longer dealing with “IT projects”, but with increasingly complex programmes of organizational change.

Leadership

LeadershipThe most important aspect of governance is leadership. Effective governance in the digital economy requires that leaders truly lead – moving beyond tactical leadership to strategic and transformational leadership. Understanding and taking ownership of the organizational, cultural and behavioural change that will be required to succeed in the digital economy – change that starts with the leaders themselves. We also need to get away from the cult of the leader to a culture of pervasive leadership. As Joel Kurtzman says in his book, Common Purpose, leaders need to move beyond the traditional “command and control” model to establishing a ”common purpose” and creating a “feeling of ‘we’ among the members of their group, team or organization”. This will require leaders who can “park”, or at least manage their egos, break down silos, and really engage with and empower all employees – fostering leadership across and at all levels in the organization. It will also require a dynamic, sense and respond approach to enterprise governance – one that is focused on value, while balancing rigour with agility. Only then will the full potential value of IT-enabled change in the digital economy be realized. The technology exists to support this today – what is lacking is the leadership mindset, will and capability make the change.

There is certainly not for a lack of proven value management practices. Since The Information Paradox was published, there has been an ever-growing proliferation of books, frameworks, methods, techniques and tools around the topic. The issue is the lack of serious and sustained adoption of them. The real challenge is one of overcoming the “knowing – doing gap”, as described by Jeffrey Pfeffer and Robert Sutton in their book of the same name. We know what to do, and the knowledge is available on how to do it. Yet, so far, there has simply been little or no appetite for, or commitment to the behavioural change required to get it done, and stick with it. This has to change!

As I said in my previous post, this will not be easy to do – very little involving organization, people and power is. However, the cost in money wasted and, more importantly, benefits and value lost, eroded or destroyed is appalling. It’s way past time to move beyond word to action. For enterprises to survive, let alone thrive in the digital economy, and for the potential individual, community and societal benefits of the digital economy to be realized, the status quo is not an option! To quote General Erik Shinseki, a former Chief of Staff of the US Army, “If you don’t like change, you’re going to like irrelevance even less!“

After all is said and done, there is more said than done!

As I have travelled around the world over the last thirty years or more, speaking to and talking with thousands of people on the topic of realizing benefits, and creating and sustaining business value from our increasingly significant and complex investments in IT-enabled change, I invariably get these three responses:

  1. You’ve given me a lot to think about;
  2. My boss should have been here; and
  3. Why aren’t we doing this?

In response to the third point, although it also encompasses the second, I decided a number of years ago to write a paper titled “Moving beyond Words to Action”, and submit it for inclusion as a chapter in a book around Enterprise Governance of IT which was being put together by a couple of colleagues of mine. In many ways, the paper was somewhat of a rant – a constructive rant, based on more years than I care to count of trying to get organizations to “get it” when it comes to the challenge of realizing the full potential of creating and sustaining value from the use of IT. I circulated the paper among a number of peers, all of whom provided constructive feedback and positive support, then submitted it to my colleagues. The good news was that they liked the paper, and thought it was much needed. The bad news was that, being academics, they were looking for more academic research for the book, and, as this was an opinion piece, they didn’t see it as a fit (although I was actually asked to write the Foreword for the book!). I was very busy at that time, so basically parked the paper and carried on with my “real” work.

However, I found myself continually going back to the paper, and, over the years since, have reworked and included much of its content in various smaller articles, and posts, and the paper in its entirety has also been used by at least one business school.

I am now, with another colleague, considering embarking on writing another book. Although the book will encompass more than that in the paper, much of the thinking behind the paper will be included. Coming off a week in New York, where I yet again heard the “Why aren’t we doing this?” question many times, I feel that this is a good time to just throw the paper out there in the hope that some readers will find it of value, and also that I will get some more feedback as we start moving ahead with the book.

The paper, the subtitle of which is the title of this post, can be found here Working Chapterv2.0 – it ends with a “call to action”, which I have included below:

Finally, if we are indeed to move beyond words, we must place an emphasis on action—on engagement and involvement at every level of the enterprise. One of the key findings presented in The-Knowing Gap is that knowledge is much more likely to be acquired from ‘learning by doing’ than from ‘learning by reading’ or ‘learning by listening’. This strongly suggests that an iterative step journey toward value management will yield, for each individual, a discrete set of opportunities for learning that, taken together across an organisation of people, form the stepping stones toward cultural transformation and the achievement of real and sustainable change. As Sun Tzu says in The Art of War, “Every journey starts with the first step.” I urge you to move beyond words and take that first step – I can’t promise that the journey will be easy, but without it, value from IT investments will remain elusive.

In reading it, do remember that it was written around seven years ago, long before the terms “digital economy”, “cloud”, “big data”, “BYOD”, etc. were in general use. Also, at the end, I discuss ISACA’s Val IT™ Framework, the development of which I led. While the framework has now been absorbed into ISACA’s new COBIT 5™, it is still available, and relevant – probably even more so – to addressing the challenge of realizing benefits from investments in IT-enabled change.

I hope that you get some value from reading the paper, and look forward to receiving your thoughts.

Reflections on 50 Years in IT- and the Pursuit of Value

SunriseIMG_2908It has been many months since my last post to this blog – the result of continued recuperation from last year’s surgery, involving a good amount of vacation travel, and a reduced work schedule.  Now however, with that all hopefully behind me, as I sit in my office looking out at the sunrise over beautiful Saanich Inlet, and the snow covered Vancouver Island mountains beyond, it seems as good a time as any to reflect on the fact that 2013 marks my 50th year working in, with and around technology. To think about what has changed, what is still changing, what hasn’t changed, and what has to change if we are to really unlock the potential value of our use of IT.

What has changed?

To cover all the changes that have occurred in 50 yrs would need a book, not a post, so suffice it to say that when I started working in 1963 for  C-E-I-R (UK) Ltd., 1401I was working with an IBM 1401, which had  a (not really published as such) processing speed  close to 10 million times slower than today’s microprocessors, 8k of storage (later upgraded, with an additional unit, to 16k), no solid state/hard drive, displays or communication capability, and no operating system (that was me!). Weighing in at around 4 tons, it needed a fully air conditioned room, with a raised floor, approximately twice the size of my living room.

Today, in my home office, I have a (now pretty old) MacBook Air with 256GB of storage, an iPad with 32 GB and an iPhone with 64 GB (I’m still not sure why I did that), and a number of printers all wirelessly connected within my house and to the world beyond through the internet. I have access to an ever growing body of knowledge that can answer almost any question I have, and, generally free through Skype, to anyone in the world I want to talk to (and see). I can manage my banking, pay bills, check my medical lab test results, organize my travel, shop, read books, listen to music, watch videos, play games, organize, edit and enhance my photographs and videos, and a myriad of other tasks. And, I can do the same from almost anywhere  – including from a lanai in Hawaii, a stateroom (we used to call them cabins) on a cruise ship or, unfortunately, now a airplane. And, of course, this doesn’t include all the other computing power in the house,  our security system, appliances, watches, cameras, cars, etc. but you get the picture. And I’m just one guy!

At the enterprise level, we have experienced extraordinary advances in computing power, storage and communications capabilities, and how we interface and interact with all this. Technology is now no longer a “black box” – it is embedded in almost all business processes, and in everything that we do. As described in a recent blog by Mark McDonald of Gartner, the technology model is changing from computing – the technology in and of itself, to consumption – how individuals and organizations use technology in ways that can create value for them and, in the case of organizations, their stakeholders.

What’s still changing?

On the technology front – everything, and at an increasingly rapid pace. We are in the middle of what I first described in a January 2012 post as a “perfect storm” of technological change, including:

  • Increasing adoption of the Cloud, Software (and just about anything else) as a Service which is fundamentally changing the delivery model for technology – and business services and, as a result, leading to seemingly endless debate about the role of the IT function and the CIO as I discussed in a January, 2011 post;
  • The explosion of “Big Data”, and along with it analytics and data visualization – here, as described by Bryan Eisenberg in a recent post, it’s not the “big” that’s so important, although it is impressive and presents it’s own challenges, but rather the shift beyond analyzing samples of data to all the data, historical data to real-time data, and structured data to unstructured data. All of which with a cost structure for using these data tools has now made it more widely available and accessible to a greater number of organizations, regardless of size. Other implications/challenges here include the need to look beyond analytical tools themselves to the creation an environment where people are able to use their organization’s date and their knowledge to improve operational and strategic performance, as described by Joe Peppard and Donald Marchand in a recent HBR article, as well as the increasing personalization of data, and the question of “whose data is it?” as discussed by my son, Jer, in a 2011 TED talk.
  • Mobility, consumerization and BYOD which are fundamentally changing how, where and when we interact with technology and access information – as described by Mark McDonald of Gartner in his previously mentioned post on the technology model changing from computing to consumption;
  • The emerging ” internet of things” (TIOT) where everything talks to everything and which, as described by Andrew Rose of Forrester in a recent WIRED UK article, brings with it unprecedented challenges in security, data privacy, safety, governance and trust.; and
  • Robotics and algorithmic computing which have considerable potential to change the nature of work as described by Sharon Gaudin in a recent Computerworld article.

This is certainly not an exhaustive list – it doesn’t, for example, include 3D printing or wearable technology, both of which will also have significant impact, and it will certainly continue to change and be added to, but it does capture the main areas where change is occurring, and the essence and magnitude of that change.

What hasn’t changed?

Back in 1998, together with what was then DMR Consulting. later Fujitsu Consulting, I wrote The Information Paradox, which described the conflict between the widely held belief that investment in IT is a good thing, and the reality that this, all to often, it’s value cannot be demonstrated. The book’s main premise was that benefits do not come from technology itself, but from IT-enabled change, and that benefits do not just happen, nor do they happen according to plan – they need to be actively managed “from concept to cash”. It put forward the view that this was not a technology problem, but one that business leaders needed to own and step up to – that realizing the potential value of IT to organizations should be an imperative for all business managers. It proposed an approach, the Benefits Realization Approach, to enable them  to address the challenge of value. In the second version of the book, published in 2003,  an Afterword built on the Benefits Realization Approach to address the essence of overall organizational governance focused on enterprise value. (A good summary of the book can be found on Basil Wood’s bazpractice blog). Yet today, 15 years since The Information Paradox was first published, the track record of so called “IT projects” remains dismal, and realizing the value promised by IT remains elusive. Why is this? The answer lies in what has not materially or broadly changed over the last 5o years, including:

  1. A continued, often blind focus on the technology itself, rather than the change  – increasingly significant and complex change – that technology both shapes and enables (more on managing change in this post);
  2. The unwillingness of business leaders to get engaged in, and take ownership of this change – preferring to abdicate their accountability to the IT function (as discussed in this post);
  3. Failure to inclusively involve the stakeholders affected by the change, without whose understanding and “buy in” failure is pretty much a foregone conclusion;
  4. A lack of rigour at the front-end of an investment decision, including, what is almost universally  a totally ineffective business case process (as described in this post);
  5. Not actively managing for value; and
  6. Not managing the journey beyond the initial investment decision.

Overall, despite all that has been written and spoken about this challenge, and the growing number of frameworks, methodologies, techniques and tools that are available, we still have  what is predominately a “culture of delivery”  – “build it and they will come” – rather than a “culture of value”, one that focuses on creating and sustaining value from an organisation’s investments and assets. For more on this , see my recent APM UK paper on the topic.

What needs to change?

In work I have been doing with Joe Peppard, we have identified 8 things that business leaders, starting with the CEO, need to do. These are:

  1. Don’t see IT as something separate from your core business – technology today is embedded in, and an integral part of most, if not all parts of your business processes.
  2. Don’t focus on the technology alone – focus on the value that can be created and sustained through the business change that technology both shapes and enables.
  3. Do recognize that you are ultimately accountable for the overall value created by all business change investments – and ensuring that accountability for the realisation of business benefits anticipated from each investment is appropriately delegated to, and accepted by, other executives and managers.
  4. Do demand rigorous analysis of every proposed business change investment, whether or not IT is involved. Ensure that you and your team know and can clearly define expected outcomes – (value), that there is a clear understanding of how that value is going to be achieved, that all relevant stakeholders have bought in to the required changes, and that they are capable of making or absorbing them and delivering on the expected outcomes.
  5. Do recognize that the business case is the most powerful tool that you have at your disposal to manage business change investments – insist on complete and comprehensive business cases, including desired outcomes, benefits, costs and risks, and clear explanation of how each benefit will be achieved with unambiguously assigned accountabilities, supported by relevant metrics.
  6. Do recognize that benefits don’t just happen and rarely happen according to plan –outcomes and plans will change – don’t think business case approval is the end of the story. Mandate that the business case be used as the key operational tool to “manage the journey”, updated to reflect relevant changes, and regularly reviewed.
  7. Do know if and when it’s time to stop throwing good money after bad, or when there are better uses for the money and “pull the plug.”
  8. If your CIO doesn’t “get” the above points, and hasn’t already been talking to you about them, get one who does and will!

So, what is it going to take to make these changes happen? For myself, I am going to continue to try to make a difference – but more directly, and more directed. Since the initial publication of The Information Paradox, I have travelled the world presenting to, talking and working with many hundreds of organizations and tens of thousands of individuals. Some of the organizations have heeded these ideas, embraced  a value culture, and continue to thrive, many have taken some of the ideas across the organization, or all of the ideas in parts of the organization with some success, and others have tried but slipped back. There are many individuals who tell me that my ideas have changed their lives – sometimes resulting in success, in other cases simply greater frustration in that they understand what has to be done but can’t make it so. At the end of many presentations or discussions, I almost invariably get the same two comments. The first – “You’ve given us a lot to think about”, to which I always reply “Great, but what are you going to DO about it?”  The second comment, which in some ways answers my question – “My boss should have been here”. Getting the “boss” to come to listen to anything that has an IT label has been, and continues to be a challenge as I discussed in my last post. Where I and they have been successful, it is only when we have got the attention, understanding and commitment of of the Executive Team. It has become quite clear that without this commitment, the best we can do is tweak around the edges – and that is just not good enough.

So, it’s time to be more direct – getting this “right” is not an option for business leaders – it’s their job and they cannot be allowed to shirk it. The CEO, supported by the Board and Executive Management Team is accountable for ensuring that effective governance is in place around IT decision-making, with specific focus on value, as well as for the selection, oversight and optimisation of value from the portfolios of business change investments and assets. This should be a condition of employment, and grounds for immediate dismissal if they with fail to do so.

It’s also time to be more directed – to get the message directly to business leaders – a shareholder or taxpayer revolt would be a good idea, but, turning 70 next year,  I can’t wait for that. I will however be working to get in front of more boards, or organizations of directors, targeting articles to more business-oriented publications, presentations to more business-oriented events, and targeting presentations, seminars and workshops to business executives.

We can, and must all play our part in this. In my case, in addition to getting more active on this blog, I am currently working on articles in business journals, as well as executive briefings and workshops – I will be co-instructing one of these, Value Management Master Class: Enterprise Governance of IT for Executives and Senior Managers, with Peter Harrison from IBM at the University of Victoria in Wellington, NZ on April 11th & 12th. If you’re interested and live in the area, or would like to visit Wellington – a beautiful city, you might want to consider this opportunity, or – even better – encourage your bosses to do so.

 

Getting Healthcare Right

I have just returned from a trip to Australia where I gave a keynote speech at the HIC 2010 Conference in Melbourne. I also had a number of other meetings and workshops while in Australia. most around the topic of healthcare and, more specifically, eHealth.

Those of you who read this blog will know that my primary passion is around value – specifically enterprises realizing value from IT-enabled change. What you may not know is that there are two areas where I have worked in the past, and continue to work, where I believe IT-enabled change has enormous potential to deliver real value, including social value – but they have as yet come nowhere near to doing so. These are healthcare and education.

Staying with healthcare, and resisting the temptation to further lambaste the UK NHS’s National Program for IT in Health (NPfIT), my experience, and a review of case studies from a number of countries, reveals two disturbing common features among them. These are:

  1. Much is said about the biggest challenge in realizing benefits/value from major IT-enabled change programs in Healthcare (often lumped under the eHealth umbrella)  being management of change – process and behavioural change – yet little or no guidance is provided on how to manage that change, or even what the major elements of change are; and
  2. Benefits are usually treated as an afterthought, often not well defined let alone evaluated until years into the program.

Basically, the approach appears to be: let’s get the technology implemented first, then we’ll find out what changes are required to “meaningfully use” the technology, then we’ll worry about the benefits. As long as we continue with this technology first approach, we will continue to fall dismally short of realizing the potential benefits of such change – the waste of money is a scandal – the opportunity cost of not delivering on the value promise is even worse. We must move from starting with the technology to “starting with the end in mind”.

Over the last few months, I have been involved in working on a number of case studies of enterprises who have made significant progress in implementing value management practices and developing a “value culture”. In preparing my speech to the HIC conference, I drew on the factors that I found to be common in the success of these enterprises – factors that I believe should be seriously considered in the healthcare context. They include:

  • Shifting the focus beyond technology, activities and cost to focus on change – process and behavioural change, outcomes and value
  • Strong and committed business leadership – change programs must be owned by the business and the business must be held accountable for the benefits of those programs
  • Appropriate business engagement and sponsorship/ownership – change cannot be done to people – it must be done with them
    • Cascading sponsorship – there must be leadership at all levels in the enterprise – this should include “formal” leadership, those appointed to lead, and “informal” leadership, those selected/looked to by their peers as leaders
    • “Front-line”  input and feedback – these are the people who usually know what needs to be done, their voice is all too often not heard
  • Clearly defined governance structure, role and responsibilities
  • Don’t underestimate the emotional and political issues around “behavioural change”
  • Be prepared to change course – both the journey and the destination
  • A strong front-end planning process with inclusive and challenging stakeholder engagement
    • Get “the right people in the room having the right discussion”
    • Use Benefits mapping workshops
      • Build clarity and shared understanding of desired outcomes
        • Recognize and balance/optimize different views of value
      • Surface “assumptions masquerading as facts”
      • Surface, understand and manage complexity – understand the full scope of effort including changes to the business model, business processes, roles and responsibilities, skills and competencies, reward systems, technology. organization structure, facilities and management of change
      • Don’t treat  as a one-time event – revisit regularly through an ongoing process
    • Avoid the “big bang” approach – break work into “do-able” chunks that deliver measurable value
  • Define, develop and maintain standard and complete business cases
    • Clearly defined outcomes
    • Full scope of effort
    • Clearly defined – and accepted – accountabilities (for outcomes – not activities)
    • Relevant metrics, both “lead” and “lag”  – “less is more” – measure what’s important and manage what you measure
  • An aligned and results-based reward system
  • A clear and transparent portfolio management process to select and optimize investments in IT-enabled change
  • Manage the journey
    • Use the updated business case as a management tool
    • A strong gating process for progressive commitment of resources
      • When things are not going to plan, understand why and be prepared to change course, change the destination or cancel the program
  • Manage and sustain the change
    • On-going inclusive two-way communication
    • Support/sustain with one-on-one coaching/mentoring
    • Celebrate and build on success
    • Learn and share

All investments in IT-enabled change are important, but few have such impact on all of us as  those in healthcare (and, I would add, education). We cannot continue to muddle through with technology-centric approaches that are designed to fail. We must learn from past failures. There is a better way. Starting with the end in mind, with strong ownership and leadership, inclusive engagement, and pro-active management of change – managing the destination and the journey – we can do better. We must do better. We deserve no less!

Value Management is not just a challenge for IT

I had the opportunity to deliver the closing keynote to the APM Benefits Management SIG Annual Conference at the National Motorcycle Museum in Birmingham, UK on Tuesday – from my home office in Victoria on Vancouver Island in BC, Canada (the view from which you can see below).
Slide1
The purpose of this blog is not to dwell on the technology that allowed me to do so – which has both advantages (in terms of not having to travel) and disadvantages (in terms of audience engagement and feedback) but to share some thoughts that I got from listening to the presentation that preceded my keynote. The presentation was entitled “Benefits in the Built Environment” and given by Matthew Walker.

Matthew defined the “Built Environment” as being “output centric” and relating to infrastructure programmes in the communications, energy, transportation, waste and water sectors. Within the UK context – and indeed any nation – these are often taken for granted – only thought about when they break – but are of strategic importance in terms of providing an economic backbone, having national security and quality of life implications and impact, and requiring sustainability targets. Investment in these sectors in the UK 2005/6 to 2009/10 has been ~£30b/yr and is currently projected to be ~£50b/yr in 2010/11 and to continue at that level until 2030, with the current drivers for investment in these areas being the economic situation, population growth and carbon reduction. Rising to this challenge requires diversification of investment methods and the political will and capability to make long-term investments. To deliver value for money, this will require prioritization of desired outcomes, and understanding of interdependency’s through effective benefits management, or – in my preferred terminology – value management. Does this sound familiar? This is what we have been talking about in the context of IT – or IT-enabled change programmes – for well over a decade or more! It gets even more familiar.

The track record of benefits management for such infrastructure investments – if you go beyond schedule, cost, and delivery to specification is largely unknown, but the indicators are not good. A 2009 APM report, “Change for the better. A Study on Benefits Management across the UK”, found that >60% of organizations had no more than an informal or incidental approach to benefits management, and ~70% felt that value was added only some of the time, or never.

Matthew’s recommendations included:

  • defining success in terms of benefits;
  • putting benefits management at the heart of oversight and governance of major programmes and projects;
  • increasing awareness and exposure of the business case;
  • using benefits management to prioritize investments; and
  • providing transparency through assurance.

Matthew stressed that achieving such a “benefits renaissance” would not be an “overnight journey”, but one that we must take – the “we” in this case including:

  • funders;
  • professional bodies;
  • business executives; and
  • construction industry practitioners.

I have long said that the issues around realizing value from IT investments or, more accurately investments in IT-enabled change, are not an IT issue but a business issue – a business issue that is not unique to IT. They are a symptom of our preoccupation with cost, activities and outputs, and our failure to move beyond this preoccupation to a focus on value – understanding the desired outcomes of an investment, and the full scope of interdependent effort required to deliver these outcomes, assigning clear accountability for outcomes – supported by relevant metrics and an aligned reward system, and designing and managing complete and comprehensive programmes to deliver those outcomes. Only when we do this – which will require significant behavioural change – will we  address “the challenge of value”,  and begin to consistently create and sustain value  for all stakeholders, including shareholders in the private sector, and taxpayers in the public sector. In today’s complex and rapidly changing economic environment, to quote from “Apollo 13”, “Failure is not an option!” Or, to quote General Erik Shinseki, a former Chief of Staff of the US Army, “If you don’t like change, you’re going to like irrelevance even less!

Behavioral Change – The Crux of the Value Challenge

As we start a new year, it is a time for me to reflect on what has passed, look ahead to what may be, and decide where to focus in 2010.

Not surprisingly, my two most referenced blog tags in 2009 were value and governance. Value because I believe that this is ultimately what everything we do should be about, and should certainly be the desired outcome of any investment, including, but certainly not limited to investment in IT-enabled change. Governance, because effective governance establishes the framework than ensures that management decisions and actions are focused on creating and sustaining value from investments  – through their full life-cycle from ideation to the management and eventual retirement of resulting assets.

I have found myself in many debates about value, including whether value is as or more important than cost or risk, or whether value implies financial and ignores intangibles. The Val IT ™ framework cuts through this debate by defining  value as “total life cycle benefits net of total life cycle costs adjusted for risk and (in the case of financial value) the time value of money”, and recognizing that benefits can be financial or non-financial. I prefer the term non-financial here to intangible as this can imply that the benefit cannot be measured. My definition of an intangible benefit is one whose contribution to value we have not yet learned to measure.

When it comes to governance, we must move beyond IT governance which perpetuates the separation between two solitudes of IT and the business. With IT embedded in just about everything we do, and becoming increasingly more so, we need to view governance of IT as an integral part of strategic enterprise governance – not a separate afterthought. We need to move away from simply talking about IT – which implies the technology alone – to IT-enabled change. IT in and of itself delivers no value – it is indeed a commodity and a cost. It  is how the business uses IT as a tool, to enable or, increasingly, to shape organizational change that actually creates or sustains value for the enterprise. The implication of this is that we will come nowhere near realizing the potential value of IT-enabled change until we have effective governance with appropriate engagement, ownership and accountability from business leadership – governance that encompasses the full life-cycle of an investment decision, including the original investment and the resulting assets.

My thoughts around what is going to take to get such effective governance include:

  1. We need to shift the focus of governance to value.
  2. Value does not come from technology itself (in this regard I would question the 2009 Capgemini Global CIO Report that assigns 20% of value to the technology) – it comes from how people use the information that technology “provides”. I have said in the past and continue to believe that information and people are the most important yet under-utilized/leveraged assets in any enterprise.
  3. While the awareness (I would not go as far as saying understanding) of executives and business management of the importance of IT is certainly (in words at least) increasing they still generally abdicate responsibility and accountability for realizing value from IT to the IT function.
  4. It may be useful here to explore the parallels (or not) with the HR function. Like IT, HR is pervasive and people are embedded in all of what an enterprise does yet, while the HR function sets HR policies and ensures compliance with laws and regulations, management of HR is recognized as the responsibility and accountability of line management – not abdicated to the HR function. This does not necessarily mean that it is done well but the responsibility and accountability are accepted.
  5. Most of today’s CIOs are not capable of fulfilling the role that has been abdicated to them or even of building the bridges that are necessary to develop the partnership with the business that is essential to move forward – many probably (again, despite what they might say) don’t want, or are not willing to do so. A recent BCS poll  identified the top 10 critical topics for CIOs, 8 of which could be addressed by adopting the principles, processes and practices contained in frameworks such as Val IT, but a leading CIO Group took the attitude that whilst they might be critical issues, they are intractable and will be with us for the next decade at least or until something traumatic happens to shake the Executive Suite into taking notice.
  6. We don’t need any more frameworks – there is no shortage of books, frameworks, methods, techniques, tools etc. to address the effective governance and management of IT and the use of IT to create and sustain value – it is the adoption of these that is painfully slow.
  7. In The Information Paradox, we talked about the need to change how we think, manage, and act – to change behaviour – both individual and group behaviour – from the Boardroom to the front-line. While recognizing this need, the years since the book was published have shown that we seriously underestimated the challenge this would present. This is where we now need to focus our efforts.

Behaviours do not happen in isolation – they are both influenced by and influence other factors. We need to look at a continuum of behaviour, the characteristics of behaviour – specifically expectations and constraints, how these change as complexity increases, and the role of technology in all of this. Human behaviour is at the core of the issue we are dealing with here.

  • Human behaviour is a continuum from individual behaviour through group behaviour (where groups can be families, committees, organizations, communities, industries, countries, regions, societies, etc.).
  • At any level, there are both expectations and constraints (habits, norms,…).
  • The larger (number of individuals), and more distributed (breadth of the network) the group, the more complex this issue becomes.
  • Technology, by increasingly operating across and breaking down physical constraints (geography, distance, time, etc.) has (exponentially) increased this complexity (of what is sometimes called the “ecosystem”).
  • Slide1Paradoxically, with the advances in technology it is becoming simpler to introduce more complexity more quickly. As illustrated in the figure below, technology creates greater expectations while at the same time requiring increasingly significant changes to behavioural habits, or norms if those expectations are to be met – all this within an increasingly complex and interdependent “ecosystem”.

In discussing the issue of complexity with a colleague, he reminded my of the words of Thomas Homer-Dixon in The Ingenuity Gap in which he says “Looking back from the year 2100, we’ll see a period when our creations – technological, social ecological – outstripped our understanding and we lost control of our destiny. And we will think: if only – if only we’d had the ingenuity and will to prevent some of that. I am convinced that there is still time to muster that ingenuity – but the hour is late.” While he was talking of loftier issues, the words ring true here also. We need to explore these behavioural challenges and, in doing so, to attempt to provide answers (or at least some insights) to the following questions:

  1. How far can we realistically move value management – including measurement and attribution of benefits – from an art to a science? (I have believed and stated for a long time that it is a total waste of time to try to get too specific/accurate about attribution where – as there usually are – there are many sources of contribution. I think that it is however very important to be explicit about assumptions that are being made and the nature of the expected contribution such that indicators can be identified which can then be tracked to validate (or otherwise) the thinking behind the assumptions and the contribution.) How long should we realistically expect this to take?
  2. What are the individual and group behaviours that both constrain and, possibly, determine how far we can go towards value management (et al) as a science? (Some/much of this revolves around understanding and acceptance of responsibility and accountability – and, possibly the prevailing “culture of blame” – as well as learning from both unsuccessful AND successful investments).
  3. What are the external factors that further influence these behaviours, e.g. boom times vs. bust times, national and industry cultures, leadership styles, etc. and how do they influence the behaviour? (This raises a further question: “To what extent is there a/one “right way” of doing this?”)
  4. What interventions can positively change these behaviours?

I am currently working on a number of initiatives around these questions, both individually and with others, I will be talking about these more over the course of the year. Beyond talking, I will also be looking for ways to broaden the dialogue and to engage with practitioners who are wrestling with these issues on a daily basis.

Waltzing with the Elephant

I have just finished reading Mark Toomey‘s Waltzing with the Elephant, subtitled A comprehensive guide to directing and controlling information technology. This has taken me longer than I had thought as the book is indeed very comprehensive. I was reminded as I read it of a comment from an early reader of The Information Paradox who described it as  “a book you want to have read but don’t want to read. If you’re an executive with control over your company’s information technology purse strings, you probably don’t want to read a book this detailed in the intricacies of IT, which is exactly the reason that you should.” But will they? I will return to this point later.

As Mark says in the book’s dedication “Through better, more responsible, and effective decision making and control, we can make better use of information technology, and we can improve the world.” I couldn’t agree more – indeed it is that belief that has driven me for the last 20+ years, and which continues to drive me. There is certainly considerable room for improvement – as Mark goes on to say “…there is a compelling reason to improve the performance of IT use within many organizations.” I would  be even stronger here in that I believe this to be the case in most, if not all organizations.

Waltzing with the Elephant is organized around the the six principles of ISO/IEC 38500:2008:

  • responsibility;
  • strategy;
  • acquisition;
  • performance;
  • conformance;
  • human behaviour.

And the three fundamental Governance tasks that it defines – Evaluate, Direct and Monitor.

Mark does a good job of explaining the principles, and of putting “meat on the bones” of what can be seen as fairly high level and broad concepts. The book is a long, but relatively easy read – helped by Mark’s refreshingly irreverent style, and the many real world examples and anecdotes he has included. Mark also makes good use of models to frame and organize sections, including an earlier version my Strategic Governance framework. Although my brief summary may not do the book justice, what I believe you should take away from it, somewhat adapted and, of course, biased by my beliefs, include:

  1. While much has been written and talked about IT governance over the last decade or more,  progress has been painfully slow. As Ian Wightwick says in his introduction, “…there is a fairly strong case for arguing that the investment in IT improvement has not delivered the desired rate of improvement.”
  2. Slide2

  3. A fundamental reason for this lack of progress is that most IT governance activities  deal only with one side of the problem – the supply side. This is what another Australian colleague of mine, Chris Gillies, calls IT governance of IT –  focused on the IT “factory”. If we are to have effective enterprise governance of IT,  as illustrated in the figure to the right, we also need to pay equal attention to the demand side – business governance of IT – focused on how the organization uses IT to create and sustain business value. For more on this, go to Back to the Basics – the Four “Ares”.
  4. If we are to make progress, there must be the  understanding that governance of IT is an important part of the overall governance framework for any organization, and that governance itself is a business system.  Governance must deal with both compliance (meeting regulatory and legislative requirements) and performance (setting and achieving goals).
  5. Ultimately, the people who should control, and be accountable for how IT is used are the business executives and managers who determine what the focus of the business is, how the business processes are performed, how the authority and control structure operates, and how the people in the system perform their roles. None of these decisions are normally within the scope of the CIO, and so, without the means of enacting any decision, the CIO cannot be held responsible or accountable for the organization‟s use of IT. The CIO should be responsible for administering the system of governance on behalf of the governing body, and accountable for most elements of the supply of IT, but not responsible for the demand and certainly not accountable for the use of IT by the business.
  6. Increasingly, we are not making investments in IT  – we are making investments in IT-enabled change. While IT may be a key enabler, all the other aspects of the business system – the business model, business processes, people, and organization need to be considered. Enterprise governance of IT must  go beyond IT strategy, the IT project portfolio and IT projects to more broadly consider the business strategy, and the portfolio(s) of business investment programmes and business and technology projects that enable and support the strategy (for more on Programme and Project Portfolio Management, go to Moving Beyond PPM to P3M and Get With The Programme.)
  7. It is not enough to just focus governance on new investments. Effective governance must cover the full life-cycle of investment decisions – covering both the initial investments and the assets that result from those investments – assets that all too often fall into what Mark calls the “business as usual” space and receive little attention until something goes wrong.
  8. Essential ingredients of the system for governance of IT include transparency and engagement. Transparency means that there is only one version of the truth – that real, accurate and relevant information flows up, down and across the system to support decision making. Engagement means that, at each level, the right people are involved in the system, in the right way with clearly defined, understood and accepted roles, responsibilities and accountabilities.
  9. Effective governance of IT will rarely be achieved by simply following a standard or a generic framework. Rather, it requires fundamental thinking about the issues that are important, and it requires that the leaders of the organization behave in ways that maximise the value and contain the risks in their current and future use of IT.
  10. Ultimately, while standards, such as  ISO/IEC 38500, and frameworks, such as Val IT™ are useful tools, improving the return on IT investments, and improving governance around those investments and resulting assets is about changing human behaviour. Merely developing and issuing policy is insufficient in driving the comprehensive behavioural change that is essential for many organizations that will seek to implement or improve the effectiveness of their enterprise governance of IT. Behaviour is key…changing or implementing a new system for governance of IT necessarily involves taking all of those people on a journey of change – which for some will be quite straight-forward and which for others, will be profoundly challenging.
  11. This journey of change must be managed as an organizational change programme. While much has been written and should be known about this, the absence of attention to the individual and organisational contexts of human behaviour in plans for IT enabled change to business systems is profound. Where there is understanding of the need to do something, enterprises often then run into “The Knowing-Doing Gap” as described by Jeffrey Pfeffer and Robert I. Sutton in their book  of the same name. As the authors say in their preface, “…so many managers know so much about organisational performance, and work so hard, yet are trapped in firms that do so many things that they know will undermine performance.” They found that “…there [are] more and more books and articles, more and more training programs and seminars, and more and more knowledge that, although valid, often had little or no impact on what managers actually did.” For more about this, go to The Knowing-Doing Gap.

I want to return now to my initial comment about who will read this book. In a recent review of the book, Fiona Balfour described it as recommended reading for academics, students of technology, all IT Professionals and “C‟ role leaders and company directors. The book provides very comprehensive and practical guidance for those who have decided that action is required, but will those who have not yet understood or committed to action read it or, more importantly, take action based on it? Almost a year ago, I was having lunch in London with Kenny MacIver, then Editor of Information Age who, after listening to me expound on this topic for some time, said “What you are saying is that we need a clarion call!” Mark’s book adds significant value to those who have decided to embark on this journey, and he is to be commended for the tremendous effort that he has put into it and for his willingness to share his experience and wisdom – but will it provide that Clarion call? It will play well to the converted, but will it convert? Going back to Ian Wightwick’s introduction, he says “Clearly the purpose of Mark Toomey‟s text is to promote the need for adequate IT governance. It is commendable in this regard, but is only the beginning. Company director (including CEO) education courses and regular director briefings will need appropriate attention with provision of simplified explanatory material and check-lists, as well as encouraging the de-mystifying of the whole business-critical IT issue.”

Despite overwhelming evidence of the need to take action to improve enterprise governance of IT, business leadership – boards, executives and business managers – have shown little appetite for getting engaged and taking accountability for their use of IT to create and sustain business value, or to embrace the transparency that must go with it. I hope that, at least in Australia, the emergence of the ISO standard, and  Mark’s book provide that much needed “clarion call”. History, unfortunately, tells us that it may take more than this – we may still have a long way to go!

ERPs – Can’t live with them – Can’t live without them!

A CIO.com article and a blog, both by Thomas Wailgum, caught my attention this week. The first, Why ERP is Still So Hard, and the second, The United Nations ERP Project: Is SAP the Right Choice?. Both caused me to reflect on ERPs – in many organizations now themselves legacy applications.

The first article opens by saying that:”After nearly four decades, billions of dollars and some spectacular failures, big ERP has become the software that business can’t live without–and the software that still causes the most angst.” Interestingly, when we wrote The Information Paradox, the major IT investments at that time were ERPs, and that is where most of the problems where. It appears that not much has changed.  The article goes on to make a number of points:

  • ERP projects have only a 7 percent chance of coming in on time, most certainly will cost more than estimated, and very likely will deliver very unsatisfying results. In addition, today’s enterprise has  little better than a 50 percent chance that users will want to and actually use the application.
  • CEOs and CFOs are still trying to wrap their heads around the financial aspects of your standard ERP package, a most unusual piece of the corporate pie: the licensing, implementation, customization, annual maintenance and upgrade costs. A CFO Research Services study of 157 senior finance executives, found that a typical company will spend an average of $1.2 million each year to maintain, modify and update its ERP system.
  • Manjit Singh, CIO of Chiquita Brands International, makes a key point that the reality CIOs face when synching business processes with those in ERP applications leads to “internal arguments over how we are going to define something simple as a chart of accounts. So all of the sudden, what looked like a very simple concept has exploded in complexity, and now you’re into trying to get some very powerful people aligned behind one vision. In some cases, you can; in some, you can’t.”
  • In a  first implementation, Taser International customized its chosen ERP package to meet the business processes that it already followed. In a subsequent upgrade, they decided to “…get rid of these customizations and go back to the best practices and recommendations out of the box”. Taser International CIO,  Steve Berg, acknowledged that the upgrade took longer than expected: Testing and training issues, as well as certain customizations that were unavoidable, complicated progress along the way.

In summary, the track record of ERP implementations continues to be spotty at best, costs are not well understood – nor are benefits, change management is a huge issue – not to be underestimated, and there needs to be an appropriate balance between “out of the box” and rampant customization.

So, let’s now look at the UN situation. My first reaction was one of relief that I did not have to do this. Not that it isn’t most likely needed, and could contribute to improving the UN’s efficiency – which is certainly a noble goal – but that it appears to a close to impossible  challenge. What are the chances of the now $337 million project actually coming in on budget – it’s already 4 months behind schedule – and delivering the expected benefits? If this is being considered a “technology project” it will almost certainly fail. If it is really an “IT-enabled change programme”, it will likely cost much more and still be challenged. To extract just a few points from Thomas’s blog:

  • “History tells us that the greatest odds for success with SAP ERP are at organizations that run lean, disciplined shops where change doesn’t have to involve translators or global resolutions.” He then goes on to quote from the UN draft report (released in an article by Fox News – not my usual source of information!) on the progress and scope of the project: “A substantial number of its administrative processes are largely based on practices from the 1940s and 1950s and supported in many cases by technology from the 1980s and 1990s…. There are at least 1,400 [non-integrated] information systems currently in the United Nations Secretariat but in many cases they are used to support or track paper-based processes. Very often, documents are printed from these systems, signed, manually, routed, photocopied and filed with associated costs in time and money. Furthermore, paper documents are usually the source of trusted information, casting doubt on the reliability and acceptance of data existing in electronic systems. The result is that we often have several versions of ‘the truth.'”
  • He acknowledges that “The implementation team…is well aware of the challenges.” Again, from the report: “[The project] is not just about implementing a new system; it is about implementing new and better ways of working together. To meet this challenge, [the project] must improve staff attitudes and skills, align processes, policies, and organizational structures with known leading practices and standards, and deploy a new global information management platform.”

It is encouraging that the implementation team does recognize that this is indeed not a technology project, but an “IT-enabled change programme”. However, the report also say:”…based on the process analysis and requirements review done to date and assuming the organization’s ability to adapt, no customizations to the core SAP code have been identified.” Given the nature of the UN, this would seem to be the mother of all assumptions. The danger here is that while starting with this understanding, the challenges will be so daunting that the “programme” will be scaled back over time to a “technology project” with significant and expensive customization, and erosion of anticipated benefits.

As Thomas concludes: “…if there is one thing that will surely doom the project—because rest assured that the software will eventually run, whether it’s by 2013 or beyond—it will be the ill-equipped users tasked with actually changing the day-to-day of their jobs to fit the strict parameters of this foreign software.”

But, does it have to end this way? Here are my thoughts on what the UN should do to improve their chances of success:

  1. Maintain active executive sponsorship – cascade sponsorship across and down through the organization.
  2. Clearly define the desired outcomes – both end outcomes and intermediate outcomes. Use some form of benefits mapping approach to do this (for more about this look at  Get With the Programme!). Develop relevant metrics – both lead and lag metrics and consolidate them in a benefits register.
  3. Assign clear accountability for all the outcomes – with consequences – align the reward system.
  4. Develop a realistic plan – schedule enough time – break it down into “do-able chunks” with clear outcomes from each.
  5. Recognize the full depth and breadth of the change – specifically cultural and behavioural change. Manage the process of change. Have a two-way communication plan – cascade it across and down to all stakeholders. Listen to the people who have to do the work – be flexible where appropriate. For more on managing change, look at Managing Change – The Key to Delivering Value.
  6. Invest in training – cascade the training using a train the trainer approach.
  7. Measure performance against the metrics – both lead and lag. Understand and act quickly and decisively on deviations.
  8. Be prepared and willing to change course – both the outcomes and the journey.
  9. Stay the course – but know when to fold.
  10. Plan for more change.

I am sure they are doing some of this today, but certainly not all, and likely not enough – if they are to avoid a costly and avoid highly visible failure, and realize real value from this significant investment they would do well to do more!

Best Practice – the Enemy of Good Practice!

Susan Cramm’s latest blog, Why Do We Ignore “Best Practices”?, has stimulated an interesting discussion about what really is the $64,000 question (actually a lot more these days!) – why do we often ignore the “blindingly obvious” and not do what we know is the right thing to do?  I discussed aspects of this question in a recent blog The Knowing-Doing Gap which referred to the book of the same name by Jeffrey Pfeffer and Robert I. Sutton. In the book, they say “…so many managers know so much about organizational performance, and work so hard, yet are trapped in firms that do so many things that they know will undermine performance.” They found that “…there [are] more and more books and articles, more and more training programs and seminars, and more and more knowledge that, although valid, often had little or no impact on what managers actually did.”

However, I don’t want to go more into the Knowing-Doing Gap here – what the blog and the associated comments caused me to reflect upon was the term “best practice”  – a term I dislike and avoid for a number of reasons:

  • Voltaire said  “the best is the enemy of the good”. We rarely need, or can afford, “the best”, and, in any event, what is best for one organization, or one situation, may not be best for other organizations, or different situations.
  • The term “best” can also create an erroneous and dangerous belief that there is no need for further improvement. The world doesn’t stand still – changes to the global economy, the regulatory environment, business models, and technology will continue at a fast rate. We must continue to learn, adapt and improve our practices – standing still is not an option.
  • Voltaire also said  “common sense is not so common” which is also relevant here. “Best practices” are all too often seen as a substitute for judgment or common sense – or for good, experienced people. As a result, they are treated as checklists to be followed blindly without the need to think. After all, “if all you have is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail”. In many cases, more focus is put on following the practice than on the desired outcome – with the means becoming more important than the end. As one commentator on Susan’s post, Mike Myatt says in his blog, The Downside of Best Practices, “My experience has been consistent over the years in that whenever a common aspect of business turns into a “practice area” and the herd mentality of the politically correct legions of consultants and advisers use said area as a platform to be evangelized, the necessity of common sense and the reality of what actually works often times gets thrown out the window as a trade-off for promotional gain.”
  • Another problem with “best”, which I see all the time, is that it implies a competition. When an organization determines that they need to improve their practices, they undertake an evaluation of “competing” practices to determine which is the best. As yet another saying goes – “the less you want to do something the more you study it”. Rather than trying to select the best – organizations should pick one and “just do it”!
  • The term that I have preferred to use, and that we use in Val IT™, is “proven practices”. We do, however, need “proven practices” that are “fit for purpose” – adapted intelligently and innovatively to specific organizational cultures and situations based on sound judgement and common sense. In this context I use one of the many definitions of common sense – “shared understanding” – which could well be extended to mean “shared values”.

All of the above notwithstanding, the real challenge here is that we are trying to get people to change their behaviour to conform to rational, logical practices. People are not always logical or rational – often egos, emotions, old habits and a variety of other factors cause them to behave  differently. Changing such behaviour requires a well-orchestrated organizational change plan (even this is badly expressed as it is not organizations that change – it is individuals). We need to move beyond what is often mandated compliance to getting “buy in” and understanding of the need to behave differently, and the value in doing it – to the organization and the individual. We need to create those shared values within which proven practices are adopted but can be adapted to meet specific situations with an appropriate balance of rigour and agility.  Unfortunately, organizational change management is still largely paid lip service to and rarely done in most organizations.

If we are to deliver on the promise of IT – if we as individuals, organizations and societies are to realize the value of IT-enabled change – we need to change the way we manage that change. We have to stop asking: “When will they do something about this?”. We are “they” – all of us – we need to change how we think, manage and act. Only when we do this will we truly realize the potential value of the changes that IT can enable!