The Traveler Returns

To quote Mark Twain, “The reports of my death are greatly exaggerated!” Understandable, however, as it has indeed been quite some time since my last post. This is largely because I have been traveling extensively – a mix of business and  personal time – including Toronto, Asia, Alaska, Vancouver, the UK and Greece. Part of the personal time included a 23 day cruise from Beijing to Vancouver. A quick scan of emails on my return – once I eliminated the 90% related to the (aptly named) Cloud –  had me yet again shaking my head and wondering whether I had not been on a cruise ship at all – rather traveling in Dr Who’s police box time machine – backwards! Here are just a couple of examples:

  • In his May 21st blog, Project Managers Need to Engage IT At the Right Time, commenting on a project predictability seminar, Jim Vaughan says “It was noted that problems with requirements management are rarely with the IT organization and process. This caught me by surprise at first because I usually thought of IT, myself included, as the source of the problem.To get to the right requirements you need the right people to define those requirements. These are not the IT people. If we let the IT people define the requirements we will likely get into trouble. That is why people will blame IT for failed projects. The correct people to define the requirements are the business people and end users.” As this is what I have done for more than 45 years – and what I assumed was well understood, if not common practice – I was amazed that Jim should be surprised by this.
  • In a May 24th Computerworld article by Julia King, These CIOs go way beyond IT-business alignment, she discusses “an admittedly unscientific short list of pioneers in IT-business convergence including  The Progressive Corp., Southwest Airlines Co. and The Procter & Gamble Co.” as well as Vanguard Group and Zappos.com where “business and IT are virtually indistinguishable” and “IT doesn’t just support the business; it enables and continually transforms the business, often creating new revenue and profit streams.” I think that this is great – but why, when we have been talking about this for decades, are there still only a small group of pioneers doing this?

On a more positive note, I attended the CICA conference in Toronto at the end of March, where I gave a Val IT™ workshop, and was pleased to have some people talk to me about Val IT before they even knew who I was, and also to discover that an increasing number of organizations, including the Office of the Auditor General of Canada, are using it, or planning to do so.

In May, I presented at the first annual CMC BC Consulting Conference in Vancouver – how could I resist speaking at a conference with the theme “Charting a course to value”. Among the other topics, there was much discussion about social media and networking and I was pleased to see a tweet sent from Chris Burdge of bWEST who was attending my presentation saying that he was finding it “surprisingly fascinating”. He has subsequently invited me to participate on a panel at a  SocialMediaCamp he’s organizing for October. My son, Jer (blprnt), is quite active in the social media scene, and has a digital art practice in which (I quote) he “explores the many-folded boundaries between science and art”. He and I have been spending quite a bit of time lately discussing the intersection of governance and social media/networking – not just the current preoccupation with how to control social media/networking but, beyond that, how it could be used to improve governance, specifically the quality of decision-making, by tapping into a much broader experience/knowledge base. I may need to spend more time with him before October.

After Vancouver, I headed off to Greece to speak at the Thessaloniki Business Conference. There was an impressive line up of speakers, all of whom had a strong focus on value.  Many of the messages resonated with me, including:

  • Professor Leslie de Chernatony, Professor of Brand Marketing Universita della Svizzera italiana and Aston Business School, who spoke about “Growing out of a recession through more effective brand strategies” stressed that that companies needed to focus on value – not price, to move beyond product quality to outcome quality, and to “watch how you invest”.
  • Howard Stevens, CEO of The HR Chally Group, talked about “Unlocking the Science of Sales Development” and reinforced the value and outcome quality messages saying that there is only a 2-3% difference in product quality between the serious players, all products can be replicated, and what really differentiates the players is the “customer experience”. He also discussed the importance of business analytics and contended that we have information management (IM) backwards – we start with the company executives when we should be starting with the customer.
  • Harold Stolovitch of HSA Learning and Performance Solutions spoke on “Maximizing Workplace Performance in Tough Economic Times” and reiterated the importance of really “walking the talk” when it comes to treating people as “your most important asset” and said that study after study shows that the most important performance blocks are failing to set expectations and failing to provide feedback.
  • Jeremy Hope, Director of the Beyond Budgeting Round Table talked about “How to save 20%-30% on costs, by managing operational bureaucracy and the introduction of modern tools for the running of the Finance Department”, claiming that replacing the annual budget with rolling plans and forecasts could save 90% of time currently spent on the budget process. This is certainly in line with my thinking as expressed in The Budgeting Circus.
  • Dr David Hillson, Director at Risk Doctor & Partners, covered the topic of “Managing risk in innovation projects”. In defining risk as “uncertainty that matters”, he suggested that risks present opportunities as well as threats, with both needing to be managed proactively, and made the case that Risk Management addresses both threats & opportunities in a single integrated process.

I spoke on the role of IT in the economic crisis, and the challenge of maximising the value from IT. I made the case that, while Nicholas Carr might say that “IT [as a commodity] doesn’t matter”, how we manage the change that IT both shapes and enables determines the success or even survival of our enterprises, and business leaders must own and be accountable for this –  it is far too important to be abdicated to the IT function.

En route to and from the Greek conference, I read Joel Kurtzman’s book, Common Purpose. The need for leadership came across in most of the above presentations, and Joel provides a very insightful critique of today’s leaders, and the need for them to move beyond the traditional “command and control” model to establishing a  “common purpose” and creating a “feeling of ‘we’ among the members of their group, team or organization”. I will review this book in greater detail in a later post.

On the subject of books, I am also reading Susan Cramm’s latest book, 8 Things We Hate about IT – as always, Susan is “right on the money” and, again, I will shortly post a review. Also, I  have received a copy of Stephen Jenner’s latest book, Transforming Government and Public Services: Realising Benefits through Project Portfolio Management, which I hope to be able to get to soon and – yes – will again be posting a review.

Hopefully, it will not be 3 months before my next post, but, as I will be slowing down somewhat through the summer – if it ever comes, it may be a while before I get back to being as prolific as I have been in the past.

Addressing the Behavioural Challenges

In my previous post, Behavioural Change – The Crux of the Value Challenge, I suggested that we don’t need any more frameworks – there is no shortage of books, frameworks, methods, techniques, tools etc. to address the effective governance and management of IT and the use of IT to create and sustain value. It is the adoption of these that is painfully slow. It is human behaviour – or rather our inability to change it –  that is at the core of the challenge. I am currently working – both individually and with others – on a number of initiatives around the need to change how we think, manage, and act – to change behaviour – both individual and group behaviour – from the Boardroom to the front-line.

I also said that I would be looking for ways to broaden the dialogue and to engage with practitioners who are wrestling with these issues on a daily basis. My silence on the blog front has largely been the result of my being engaged with a number of individuals and groups in this space, including a quick trip to Europe and the UK last week, where I met and talked with a number of enterprises – some of whom have been on this value journey for 10 years or more. These discussions, and subsequent reflection, have crystallized a number of thoughts in my mind. These include:

  1. A critical factor in determining success or failure of value management is the presence or absence of a clear owner of the value management issue or process.
  2. The “tipping point” – when value management practices start to get traction and become embedded in enterprises – is when the executive and senior management move beyond awareness and understanding of the issue to commitment to action – beyond “talking the talk” to “walking the talk”. This is illustrated in the figure below (figure and text below is adapted from The Information Paradox). Slide1At the thinking, or cognitive level, we recognize and become aware of a need to change. This often translates itself fairly rapidly into talk: “We at Thorp Inc. have to make fundamental changes to our organization.” All too often, the nature of those changes is not understood, and the definition of them is delegated, or more accurately abdicated. The reaction to this is often “This too will pass,” and all too often, it does. It is only when we wake up at three in the morning, reaching for the antacid, as we feel our stomach churning with the realization of the implications of the change and the breadth and depth of what has to change, that we begin to reach understanding. This is the precursor to commitment. The bottom line here is that we can only “walk our talk” when we fully understand what we are saying. Treating the implementation or improvement of value management practices as an organizational change programme – which it is – the use of some form of benefits modeling, which is discussed later, can bring you to an earlier awakening. When we have the understanding necessary to build commitment, to understand the full extent of what we are committing to, then, and only then, are we ready to act. Even then, we can act only if we have the resource capability and capacity to do so.
  3. Those enterprises that have passed this “tipping point” have been able to effectively apply value management practices to guide informed and intelligent decision-making during the current economic crisis – those that haven’t generally fell back to “old ways” with often across the board cost cuts.
  4. Value management practices are most effective when they are closely integrated with, and part of the business planning process. Going beyond this, they are most effective when they are integrated with overall enterprise governance.
  5. Incremental approaches to implementing and improving value management practices are more successful than  “big bang” ones.
  6. The areas of value management that appear to provide the greatest improvement in value management practices and outcomes are:
    1. Improving the business case process; and
    2. Taking the portfolio view.
  7. The factors that continue to constrain effective adoption of value management practices include:
    1. Failing to define, accept or put rigour into accountability for performance; and
    2. Clearly related to the above, failure to align the reward system such that there are consequences – both positive and negative.
  8. The interventions that appear to have been the most successful in changing behaviours, and helping enterprises move beyond awareness and understanding to commitment and action include:
    1. Inclusive engagement of all the stakeholders through workshops (for more on engagement, see The Challenge of Business Engagement);
    2. Use of benefits modeling techniques in workshops to get everyone “on the same page” – building a broader base of understanding of, and support for value management, including the need for business cases with clear accountability, relevant metrics and an aligned reward system;
    3. One-on-one coaching, and
    4. Active and on-going executive and senior management involvement where they are seen to be “walking the talk”.

In preparation for a workshop with one of the groups I am working with, I put together a short survey with the objective of:

  • Understanding the current and target levels of maturity related to value management (based on  the Value Governance [VG] domain high-level maturity model in ISACA‘s Val IT™ Framework 2.0.);
  • Understanding how long it has taken to reach the current level of maturity, and how long it is anticipated to take to reach the target level;
  • Identifying the factors that have either supported or constrained adoption, and to what extent they have done so;
  • Identifying interventions and the extent to which they have enabled adoption; and
  • Understanding the organizational context of the responding enterprise (optional).

Again, in the interests of broadening the dialogue, I would like to extend this survey to a broader audience. The survey is targeted at individuals who are involved in improving value management practices, including, but not limited to some or all of: leadership behaviour; process implementation and adoption (including business cases, portfolio, programme management and project management); roles, responsibilities and accountabilities (for both supply and demand); organizational structure (including Investment Decision Boards, and Value / Portfolio / Programme / Project Management Offices); information requirements (including metrics and reporting); and supporting tools (data collection, analysis and reporting).

You can access the survey here. The survey should not take much more than 10 mins to complete. The survey has 3 pages, and contains 10 questions.  Questions regarding “Current and target maturity levels”, and “Constraints to adoption and interventions to address” must be answered, but answers to “Organizational Context” questions are optional. Assuming that I get enough responses to yield a meaningful result, I will post results on this site in a later post. All information will be aggregated, and specific information about your organization, if provided, will be treated as confidential and will not be published without your express permission.

One of the challenges that we all have in trying to implement or improve value management practices is the perceived – and indeed real – enormity of the task. As per one of my observations above, this is why an incremental – and often pragmatic and opportunistic – approach is required. The business case, as discussed in an earlier post Lies, Damn Lies, and Business Cases, is the foundation on which all else is built, and, as such, sows the seeds of success or failure. Portfolio management is a powerful tool but if it is populated with “toxic” business cases, it will only give the illusion of progress. This is leading me to focus my attention on the business case and think about how, through workshops and benefits modeling, supported by one-on- one coaching we can change the view of business cases as a bureaucratic hurdle to be got over and then forgotten to being one of the most powerful tools available – turning it from an enemy to a valuable friend! If we can do this, we will have a solid foundation on which to further improve value management practices.

Waltzing with the Elephant

I have just finished reading Mark Toomey‘s Waltzing with the Elephant, subtitled A comprehensive guide to directing and controlling information technology. This has taken me longer than I had thought as the book is indeed very comprehensive. I was reminded as I read it of a comment from an early reader of The Information Paradox who described it as  “a book you want to have read but don’t want to read. If you’re an executive with control over your company’s information technology purse strings, you probably don’t want to read a book this detailed in the intricacies of IT, which is exactly the reason that you should.” But will they? I will return to this point later.

As Mark says in the book’s dedication “Through better, more responsible, and effective decision making and control, we can make better use of information technology, and we can improve the world.” I couldn’t agree more – indeed it is that belief that has driven me for the last 20+ years, and which continues to drive me. There is certainly considerable room for improvement – as Mark goes on to say “…there is a compelling reason to improve the performance of IT use within many organizations.” I would  be even stronger here in that I believe this to be the case in most, if not all organizations.

Waltzing with the Elephant is organized around the the six principles of ISO/IEC 38500:2008:

  • responsibility;
  • strategy;
  • acquisition;
  • performance;
  • conformance;
  • human behaviour.

And the three fundamental Governance tasks that it defines – Evaluate, Direct and Monitor.

Mark does a good job of explaining the principles, and of putting “meat on the bones” of what can be seen as fairly high level and broad concepts. The book is a long, but relatively easy read – helped by Mark’s refreshingly irreverent style, and the many real world examples and anecdotes he has included. Mark also makes good use of models to frame and organize sections, including an earlier version my Strategic Governance framework. Although my brief summary may not do the book justice, what I believe you should take away from it, somewhat adapted and, of course, biased by my beliefs, include:

  1. While much has been written and talked about IT governance over the last decade or more,  progress has been painfully slow. As Ian Wightwick says in his introduction, “…there is a fairly strong case for arguing that the investment in IT improvement has not delivered the desired rate of improvement.”
  2. Slide2

  3. A fundamental reason for this lack of progress is that most IT governance activities  deal only with one side of the problem – the supply side. This is what another Australian colleague of mine, Chris Gillies, calls IT governance of IT –  focused on the IT “factory”. If we are to have effective enterprise governance of IT,  as illustrated in the figure to the right, we also need to pay equal attention to the demand side – business governance of IT – focused on how the organization uses IT to create and sustain business value. For more on this, go to Back to the Basics – the Four “Ares”.
  4. If we are to make progress, there must be the  understanding that governance of IT is an important part of the overall governance framework for any organization, and that governance itself is a business system.  Governance must deal with both compliance (meeting regulatory and legislative requirements) and performance (setting and achieving goals).
  5. Ultimately, the people who should control, and be accountable for how IT is used are the business executives and managers who determine what the focus of the business is, how the business processes are performed, how the authority and control structure operates, and how the people in the system perform their roles. None of these decisions are normally within the scope of the CIO, and so, without the means of enacting any decision, the CIO cannot be held responsible or accountable for the organization‟s use of IT. The CIO should be responsible for administering the system of governance on behalf of the governing body, and accountable for most elements of the supply of IT, but not responsible for the demand and certainly not accountable for the use of IT by the business.
  6. Increasingly, we are not making investments in IT  – we are making investments in IT-enabled change. While IT may be a key enabler, all the other aspects of the business system – the business model, business processes, people, and organization need to be considered. Enterprise governance of IT must  go beyond IT strategy, the IT project portfolio and IT projects to more broadly consider the business strategy, and the portfolio(s) of business investment programmes and business and technology projects that enable and support the strategy (for more on Programme and Project Portfolio Management, go to Moving Beyond PPM to P3M and Get With The Programme.)
  7. It is not enough to just focus governance on new investments. Effective governance must cover the full life-cycle of investment decisions – covering both the initial investments and the assets that result from those investments – assets that all too often fall into what Mark calls the “business as usual” space and receive little attention until something goes wrong.
  8. Essential ingredients of the system for governance of IT include transparency and engagement. Transparency means that there is only one version of the truth – that real, accurate and relevant information flows up, down and across the system to support decision making. Engagement means that, at each level, the right people are involved in the system, in the right way with clearly defined, understood and accepted roles, responsibilities and accountabilities.
  9. Effective governance of IT will rarely be achieved by simply following a standard or a generic framework. Rather, it requires fundamental thinking about the issues that are important, and it requires that the leaders of the organization behave in ways that maximise the value and contain the risks in their current and future use of IT.
  10. Ultimately, while standards, such as  ISO/IEC 38500, and frameworks, such as Val IT™ are useful tools, improving the return on IT investments, and improving governance around those investments and resulting assets is about changing human behaviour. Merely developing and issuing policy is insufficient in driving the comprehensive behavioural change that is essential for many organizations that will seek to implement or improve the effectiveness of their enterprise governance of IT. Behaviour is key…changing or implementing a new system for governance of IT necessarily involves taking all of those people on a journey of change – which for some will be quite straight-forward and which for others, will be profoundly challenging.
  11. This journey of change must be managed as an organizational change programme. While much has been written and should be known about this, the absence of attention to the individual and organisational contexts of human behaviour in plans for IT enabled change to business systems is profound. Where there is understanding of the need to do something, enterprises often then run into “The Knowing-Doing Gap” as described by Jeffrey Pfeffer and Robert I. Sutton in their book  of the same name. As the authors say in their preface, “…so many managers know so much about organisational performance, and work so hard, yet are trapped in firms that do so many things that they know will undermine performance.” They found that “…there [are] more and more books and articles, more and more training programs and seminars, and more and more knowledge that, although valid, often had little or no impact on what managers actually did.” For more about this, go to The Knowing-Doing Gap.

I want to return now to my initial comment about who will read this book. In a recent review of the book, Fiona Balfour described it as recommended reading for academics, students of technology, all IT Professionals and “C‟ role leaders and company directors. The book provides very comprehensive and practical guidance for those who have decided that action is required, but will those who have not yet understood or committed to action read it or, more importantly, take action based on it? Almost a year ago, I was having lunch in London with Kenny MacIver, then Editor of Information Age who, after listening to me expound on this topic for some time, said “What you are saying is that we need a clarion call!” Mark’s book adds significant value to those who have decided to embark on this journey, and he is to be commended for the tremendous effort that he has put into it and for his willingness to share his experience and wisdom – but will it provide that Clarion call? It will play well to the converted, but will it convert? Going back to Ian Wightwick’s introduction, he says “Clearly the purpose of Mark Toomey‟s text is to promote the need for adequate IT governance. It is commendable in this regard, but is only the beginning. Company director (including CEO) education courses and regular director briefings will need appropriate attention with provision of simplified explanatory material and check-lists, as well as encouraging the de-mystifying of the whole business-critical IT issue.”

Despite overwhelming evidence of the need to take action to improve enterprise governance of IT, business leadership – boards, executives and business managers – have shown little appetite for getting engaged and taking accountability for their use of IT to create and sustain business value, or to embrace the transparency that must go with it. I hope that, at least in Australia, the emergence of the ISO standard, and  Mark’s book provide that much needed “clarion call”. History, unfortunately, tells us that it may take more than this – we may still have a long way to go!

Moving Beyond PPM to P3M

Over the last little while, I have been asked to write introductions to, or testimonials for a number of books on Project Portfolio Management (PPM). This has caused me some angst because, while PPM most certainly has its place and is a valuable management tool, the name also unfortunately perpetuates the myth that IT projects, in and of themselves, deliver value. As discussed in an earlier post, Get With The Programme!, we need to move beyond IT projects to comprehensive business change programmes.

The concepts of portfolio management (as related to IT investments) and programme management were introduced in The Information Paradox. While portfolio management has seen significant adoption since then, largely in the form of PPM, the adoption of programme management has been slower, which certainly contributes to the popularity of the PPM term. (It would likely help if we could all agree on a common spelling of program/me!)

I have heard  number of arguments against using the term “programme” including that we are making things too complex by introducing another term, it scares people, and it doesn’t apply to small enterprises etc. The reality is that much of what we are enabling with IT today is complex – very complex, and denying that results in even greater complexity. Taking the programme view facilitates better understanding – shared understanding – of complexity and, as a result, more effective management of change. Regarding scaring people, I always say when I am presenting or discussing this topic that if the audience doesn’t leave both excited and scared, they haven’t “got it”. As Albert Einstein once said “You cannot solve a problem by applying the same thinking that got you into the problem in the first place.” We need to shake people out of their complacency and get them to think and act differently. I also believe that the concept of programme applies just as much to smaller enterprises – appropriately  scaled to fit  size and culture.

Programme management does now appear to be gaining some momentum. In addition to ITGI’s Val IT™, both OGC and PMI have programme-related materials. In a recent research paper, Gartner states “Organisations are discovering that program management is a level of business discipline that is key to delivering business outcomes”. It goes on to say that “We are focusing on a specific research project that addresses strategic program management – an emerging discipline focused around the multi project delivery of business outcomes…we believe that this is the management construct best suited to enable better business engagement, value delivery and risk.”

The definition of Portfolios, Programmes and Projects – as introduced in The Information Paradox, and continued in Val IT – is illustrated in the figure below.
Slide1

Given the above definitions and relationships, I would strongly recommend adoption of the term “Programme and Project Portfolio Management”, or P3M to better reflect both the relationships between portfolios, programmes and projects and the need to have all 3 in place. Indeed, I usually portray this with the “3” in superscript (which WordPress doesn’t seem to like) as I truly believe that it is “P to the power of 3 M”. While all three are necessary, none are sufficient on their own. All three, working together, are needed if enterprises are to:

  • Identify, define, select and execute new investments in IT-enabled change such that they maximize value creation and sustainment, taking early corrective action when this is at risk
  • Make intelligent spending decisions, focusing on spend that creates or sustains value, and avoiding the value destruction inherent in across-the-board (percentage) cuts
  • Ensure that their ongoing investments optimize benefits –  contributing to the creation and sustainment of  value – and again, where this is at risk, take early and appropriate corrective action
  • Deliver business and technology capabilities in a reliable, responsive and cost-effective manner

The relationship between Portfolios, Programmes and Projects, in the context of value management, is illustrated in the figure below.

Slide1

There is an argument that you shouldn’t consider portfolio management until you have dealt with project and programme management, i.e. get delivery right before you determine if you are doing the right things and creating or sustaining business value. I clearly do not agree with that argument – as Peter Drucker said “There is nothing worse than doing well that which should not be done at all!” Portfolio and Programme Management are the vehicles that bridge the gap between strategy and execution – ensuring alignment with business objectives and delivery of value through investments in IT-enabled change by effectively understanding and managing that change. Project management ensures that the technology and business capabilities required to enable the IT-enabled change and the resulting benefits and value are delivered. If we are to realize the full potential of IT-enabled change and translate that into real and sustainable business value, we need to work to all three of these areas – we have no choice!

Drive Profit and Sales Growth Through IT Portfolio Planning

A colleague in Australia sent me this document by Asad Quraishi of Knowledgework (a Canadian organization as it turns out). While the ideas are not new, nor necessarily complete (what document is/can be?) – one serious omission being no reference to The Information Paradox (just, not quite, joking) – it is concise and well organized and, as such, a useful addition to the field of portfolio management (not just planning).

The language used in the document does however risk perpetuating beliefs that need to be changed in that the use of the IT label in “IT portfolio planning”, “IT value”, and “IT governance” can be read as reinforcing the prevailing view that the challenge, and poor track record of realizing value from today’s significant and increasingly complex investments in IT is an IT problem, and the responsibility of the IT function – an implication that is reinforced in the Summary which talks only about the requirement for a “highly effective IT organization.”
Whilst no-one could dispute the need for an effective IT organization, this is not enough. IT, in and of itself, delivers no value – it is how the business uses IT – in the context of IT-enabled change – that delivers value. If organizations are to truly realize the full potential of IT, they need to think and act very differently. If we are to accomplish this, one thing we must do is change the language we use. We must move beyond the term “IT governance”, which today largely focus on the “supply” side – the delivery and operation of IT services to “Enterprise (or Corporate) governance of IT” covering both the supply side and the “demand” side – determining what services are required and using those services to create and sustain business value. This requires the executive, business management and the IT function to work in partnership with clearly defined (and accepted) roles, responsibilities and accountabilities for both the supply and demand aspects of IT, supported by processes including portfolio management, and relevant metrics.
While there is still room for improvement in many, if not most organizations, in how IT services are delivered (the supply side) we will continue to come nowhere near realizing the full potential of IT-enabled change – and IT will remain the “black sheep of the corporate family” – until the business takes ownership of the demand side, in partnership with IT on the supply side, within the context of overall enterprise governance, including IT. Let’s start using language that moves us in this direction!